Course level:
100 | 200 | 300 | 400
AS-150 Japanese Culture & Society
An introduction to the culture and society of Japan, exploring themes, issues, and institutions in Japan, as seen through the lens of Japanese culture. The course investigates how Japanese culture evolved within the changing socio-political milieu from the 6th century onward. Major topics include cultural notions used in the construction of self, family, education, work, and religious practice. Students acquire the skills and mindset to facilitate the study of Japan, a non-western culture, in a culturally appropriate manner. Readings in English.


AS-151 Chinese Culture & Society
Introduction to Chinese popular culture and society through an examination of the major trends in music, art, literature, television, film, fashion, and the internet over the last three decades. The connection between popular culture and politics, ideology, history and tradition serves to illustrate various changes over time. Readings and discussion in English. Those who can read Chinese may have additional reading opportunities.


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AS-214 East Asian Cultures and Societies: Exploring Connections
Study of Chinese and Japanese cultures and societies from a comparative perspective. This course explores the transnational connections between the two East Asian countries from premodern times to the contemporary. By studying the similarities and differences in various social and cultural topics and issues between China and Japan, students examine and compare the core values and identities of the two cultures. The course prepares students for further study in China and/or Japan. All readings are in English.


AS-218 Chinese Popular Culture & Society
Introduction to Chinese popular culture and society through an examination of the major trends in music, art, literature, television, film, fashion, and the internet over the last three decades. The connection between popular culture and politics, ideology, history and tradition serves to illustrate various changes over time. Readings and discussion in English. Those who can read Chinese may have additional reading opportunities.


AS-222 China: 30 Years in Literature and Film
China: 30 Years in Literature and Film aims to familiarize students with key issues in contemporary China through the medium of literature and film. Key issues and topics include memory and trauma, modernization and globalization, youth and popular culture.


AS-224 Chinese Folklore
Study of the history, transformation, and practices of Chinese folklore both in China and Chinese communities abroad. Focus is on the rich repertoire of Chinese folklore; its representations in literature, pop culture, daily life, and political discourse; and its significant roles in shaping ideas about morality, nation, gender, ethnicity, and heritage; its contribution to the spread of religion, the pursuit of status, and the achievement of modernity. The course helps students to understand the ways Chinese at the grass-roots level live and think.


AS-225 Contemporary Chinese Writers
In the 30 years after the end of the Cultural Revolution (1966-76), the literary world of China has undergone various changes that mirror and anticipate social and political shifts. In this course we will read representative works of the so-called scar literature, reflection literature, reform literature, avant-garde literature, new realist literature, and modernist literature. Authors include mainland writers Yu Hua, Mo Yan, Su tong, Wang Anyi, Wang Shuo, Wang Meng, Chi Zijian, as well as Chinese expatriates Gao Xingjian, Ha Jin, Yan Geling, and Dai Sijie. We will also watch a few films that are based on some of the readings for this class.


AS-226 Sixth Generation Directors in China
Chinese films, for the US audience, are mostly kungfu-related. In the movie theaters, American viewers are taken back to the exotic ancient China and immersed in an alien culture that invokes little of what China is today. This course, entitled “It’s not all about Kungfu: Sixth Generation Directors in China”, endeavors to bring the real China to the students by exploring a representative body of work to showcase social issues that often occupy center stage in these directors’ films.


AS-227 Folktales and Fairy Tales: From the Brothers Grimm to China
Study of the history, uses, and reshaping of folktales and fairy tales in the oral, literary, and filmic traditions of both the Western world and China. Focus is on the underlying forces and reasons for the radical transformations of these tales in form and meaning; their significant roles in constructing nation, ethnicity, class, gender, and morality; and their nature as an art form of questioning the larger culture. It introduces the methods of narrative analysis and cultural criticism in folktale research.


AS-229 Tourism and Culture in China
Study of the literary and bodily encounters between places, people, capital, and cultures in the context of China’s modernization and globalization. Students read historical and contemporary travel writings, view documentary films, and analyze ethnographically-based research to explore what happens on the meeting grounds between "hosts" and "guests" and how these encounters shape landscapes, nation building, ethnic identities, traditions, and gender and class boundaries. All readings are in English. Prerequisites: One of the following courses: Anthropology 103, Anthropology 106, History 103, History 110, Religion 101, or Visual Art History 131. Cross-listed with Asian Studies.


AS-234 Social Stratification, Diversity, and Culture (US/Japan)
Social stratification (US/Japan) examines social inequality in the areas of racial/ethnic diversity, gender ideology and sex roles, and economic stratification. The course considers how Japanese society is undergoing significant social change under the influence of globalization, international political influence and civil rights activism. Cross cultural comparisons will be made in labor markets, political ideology that relates to gender and race/ethnic stratification, and the rise of reactionary nationalism and its impact on labor migration and economic inequality.


AS-235 Ideology and Social Change in Japan
Ideology and Social Change in Japan addresses ideological narratives and political policy related to contemporary social issues in Japan. This course approaches Japan from a comparative perspective, with reference to globalization and its effects on Japanese society. Topics include Constitutional Reform, Military/Political Alliances, Nationalism, racial/ethnic minorities, crime, gender roles, sexuality and family, the “soft power” politics of youth and popular culture, and economic stratification in the labor market.


AS-236 Disaster Japan: Earthquake, Tsunami, Nuclear Crisis and the Politics of 3.11
The great East Japan Tohoku Earthquake of March 11, 2011 was among the greatest disasters in history and the direst social crisis in Japan in the post-war era. This course examines the events of 3.11, from the immediate aftermath of the Tsunami, Earthquake and nuclear crisis and the application of crisis management philosophies and procedures, to its influence on Japanese Civil Society, electoral politics and the reinvigoration of the anti-nuclear movement, and volunteerism in participatory politics.


AS-237 Japan in Film
Japanese culture that is depicted in international cinema does not address this society in all its complexity. This course utilizes influential Japanese films whose themes touch on Japanese society in areas such as gender and sexuality, popular culture, politics, crime/deviance, and ethnic identity. The films in this course are utilized as a way into a deeper analysis of Japanese society, not only in comparison to Western culture but also as a means to understand Japan in its own terms.


AS-238 Classical Japanese Literature and its Modern Interpretations
Survey of Japanese literature, beginning with the creation myth recorded in 712 and continuing to the dramatic arts of the 1600s. Course examines legends, folk tales, fairy tales, poetic anthologies, diaries and fiction. Lecture/ discussion format. Readings in English; no knowledge of Japanese required.


AS-244 Anthropology and History of Tibet
By adapting literatures on Tibet from the disciplines of anthropology and history, this interdisciplinary seminar introduces the ways in which “Tibet – as a unit of Asian/Area Studies” can be understood through the analytical lenses of (1) ethnicity, (2) civilization, and (3) geopolitics. The course is intended to deepen students' appreciation of what Asian Studies as a discipline can do to comprehend the everlasting interconnections among the local, the regional, and the global.


AS-247 What is REAL? Extraordinary Fiction in Japan and the World
Study of various permutations of the science fiction genre-legends, fairy tales, myths, supernatural and futuristic short stories, and novels. Major emphasis is on Japanese works, with cross-cultural comparisons to offer diverse perspectives. Course focuses on the literary analysis of the individual texts, while exploring the real purpose served by these unreal creations. Reading in English.


AS-248 Traditional Japanese Theatre
Study of traditional Japanese theatre, focusing on Noh, Bunraku Puppet Theatre, and Kabuki from the fourteenth century to the present. The course examines major theories and a variety of representative plays of the three theatrical forms and investigates their artistic, religious, and socio-cultural significances. Emphasis is on adaptation of literary canons, treatment of convention, seminal playwrights, and performance styles. Instruction in performing Noh chanting and dancing unites theory and performance to deepen understandings of the non-western tradition. Readings in English


AS-250 The Ebb and Flow: Japanese Women's Literature-The First 1200 Years
Examination of a variety of Japanese women writers, genres, and movements ranging from 800 to 2002. Using feminist and other literary criticism, the course analyzes the category Joryubungaku (women's literature) and its import in relation to the Japanese literary canon. Authors include Murasaki Shikibu, Enchi Fumiko, Nogami Yaeko, Machi Tawara, and Yoshimoto Banana. Readings in English.


AS-265 Methods for Japanese Studies
Introduction to Japanese studies as an interdisciplinary subject. Students study a prominent literary text (Tale of Genji or modern novel) and the various literary methods for analysis while also being introduced to other disciplinary methods, including history, art, anthropology, drama, translation studies, women's studies, and religion.


AS-266 Methods for Japanese Studies
Examination of the cultural development of Japan in various disciplines. Students investigate and analyze the topic from various perspectives using a variety of texts and visual documents to construct a framework that encompasses disciplines such as politics, religion, language and literature, art, and theatre. Students develop an understanding of the research methods and critical theories relevant to these disciplines and the topic, and a mastery of effective communications skills.


AS-271 South Asia: Contemporary Issues in Historical Perspective
Study of contemporary cultural issues in the Indian sub-continent, viewed through the historical events and texts that have generated them.


AS-272 Survey of South Asian Literature
Study of major South Asian literary works in translation, including epics from North and South India, Sanskrit drama, Muslim literature, modern novels and short stories. Complete works read from an interdisciplinary perspective, using criticism from Western and South Asian sources.


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AS-326 Sixth Generation Directors in China
Chinese films, for the US audience, are mostly kungfu-related. In the movie theaters, American viewers are taken back to the exotic ancient China and immersed in an alien culture that invokes little of what China is today. This course, entitled “It’s not all about Kungfu: Sixth Generation Directors in China”, endeavors to bring the real China to the students by exploring a representative body of work to showcase social issues that often occupy center stage in these directors’ films.


AS-338 Classical Japanese Literature and its Modern Interpretations
Survey of Japanese literature beginning with the creation myth recorded in 712 and continuing to the dramatic arts of the 1600s. Course examines legends, folk tales, fairy tales, poetic anthologies, diaries and fiction as well as their modern variations such as video games, anime, manga and film. Lecture/ discussion format. Readings in English; no knowledge of Japanese required. Same course as AS 238 with additional reading and assignments designed for Japanese Studies majors.


AS-340 Notions of Modernity in Modern Japanese Fiction
Fiction Seminar on the modern Japanese novel from the late Meiji period to the present. Of primary concern is the fictional and psychological portrayal of the changes Japan faces as it emerges from a feudal society to a modern nation. Notions of self, other, gender, class, and race are considered alongside the concepts of modernism, post-modernism, and pure and popular literature. Authors include Tanizaki Junichiro, Oe Kenzaburo, and Murakami Haruki. Readings in English and Japanese


AS-341 The Pure and Popular: Genre in Modern Japanese Literature
Study of various genres of literature from the Meiji Period (1868-1912) to the present, which includes both "pure" and "popular" works. Genres include diaries, plays, and various kinds of novels such as the "I-novel," lyrical novels and modern thrillers. Seminar format with intensive reading and writing in Japanese and English at an advanced level. Authors to be read include Ishikawa Takuboku, Yasunari Kawbata, Kirino Natsuo, and Murakami Haruki.


AS-343 Japanese Detective Fiction
Who Dunnit and Why? Japanese Detective Fiction - Past and Present : Seminar on detective fiction and mysteries and their evolution in Japan from the Taisho period (1912-1926) to present day. From Edogawa Rampo’s short mystery stories to Kirino Natsuo’s modern day novels of crime, students explore the social, political, and historical connections to these "who dunnit" works. Topics of discussion include: narrative technique, style, influence from other literary traditions (east and west), as well as issues of class, gender, and concepts of justice. Prerequisites: AS 265 or 266 and for 343: B or better in a Japan related course; For 403: Junior or senior standing with Japanese Studies major or minor; majors must write their senior thesis as part of the course.


AS-344 War and Peace in Japanese Literature from Genji to Godzilla
Course examines Japanese works written during and about war and peace from antiquity to present, including some non-Japanese works with interviews of war survivors. Students investigate the social, political, and intellectual background associated with each work while navigating various issues such as sponsorship, censorship, overt propaganda, implicit and explicit political views, and shifts in authorial tone and content over time. Covers all genres including film. 400 level is capstone for Japanese Studies major and thesis and oral presentation are required.


AS-347 What is REAL? Extraordinary Fiction in Japan and the World
Study of the various permutations of the science fiction genre - legends, fairy tales, myths, supernatural and futuristic short stories and novels. Major emphasis is on Japanese works, yet occasional, cross-cultural comparisons to offer diverse perspectives. Course focuses on the literary analysis of the individual texts, while exploring the real purpose served by these unreal creations. Same course as AS 247 with additional reading and assignments designed for Japanese Studies majors


AS-348 Traditional Japanese Theatre
Advanced study of traditional Japanese theatre, focusing on Noh, Bunraku Puppet Theatre, and Kabuki from the fourteenth century to the present. the course examines major theories and a variety of representative plays of the three theatrical forms and investigates their artistic, religious, and socio-cultural significances. Emphasis is on adaptation of literary canons, treatment of convention, seminal playwrights, and performance styles. Instruction in performing Noh chanting and dancing unites theory and performance to deepen understandings of the non-western tradition. Same as AS 247 with additional readings and assignments designed for Japanese Studies majors


AS-350 The Ebb and Flow: Japanese Women's Literature-The First 1200 Years
Examination of a variety of Japanese women writers, genres, and movements ranging from 800 to 2002. Using feminist and other literary criticism, inquiry analyzes the category Joryubungaku (women's literature) and its import in relation to the Japanese literary canon. Authors include Murasaki Shikibu, Enchi Fumiko, Nogami Yaeko, Machi Tawara, and Yoshimoto Banana. Readings in English. Same as AS 250 with additional readings and assignments designed for Japanese Studies majors.


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AS-401 Seminar: Modernity in Modern Japanese Fiction
Fiction Seminar on the modern Japanese novel from the late Meiji period to the present. Of primary concern is the fictional and psychological portrayal of the changes Japan faces as it emerges from a feudal society to a modern nation. Notions of self, other, gender, class, and race are considered alongside the concepts of modernism, post-modernism, and pure and popular literature. Authors include Tanizaki Junichiro, Oe Kenzaburo, and Murakami Haruki. Readings in English and Japanese. For junior/senior Japanese Studies majors, who write their senior thesis as part of the course.


AS-402 Seminar Genre in Modern Japanese Literature
Advanced seminar for the study of various genres of literature from the Meiji Period (1868-1912) to the present, which includes both "pure" and "popular" works. Genres to be read include diaries, plays, and various kinds of novels such as the "I-novel," lyrical novels and modern thrillers. Seminar format with intensive reading and writing in Japanese and English at an advanced level. Authors to be read include Ishikawa Takuboku, Yasunari Kawbata, Kirino Natsuo, and Murakami Haruki. For junior/senior Japanese Studies majors, who write their senior thesis as part of the course.


AS-403 Japanese Detective Fiction
Who Dunnit and Why? Japanese Detective Fiction - Past and Present : Seminar on detective fiction and mysteries and their evolution in Japan from the Taisho period (1912-1926) to present day. From Edogawa Rampo’s short mystery stories to Kirino Natsuo’s modern day novels of crime, students explore the social, political, and historical connections to these “who dunnit” works. Topics of discussion include: narrative technique, style, influence from other literary traditions (east and west), as well as issues of class, gender, and concepts of justice. Prerequisites: AS 265 or 266 and for 343: B or better in a Japan related course; For 403: Junior or senior standing with Japanese Studies major or minor; majors must write their senior thesis as part of the course.


AS-404 War and Peace in Japanese Literature from Genji to Godzilla.
Course examines Japanese works written during and about war and peace from antiquity to present, including some non-Japanese works with interviews of war survivors. Students investigate the social, political, and intellectual background associated with each work while navigating various issues such as sponsorship, censorship, overt propaganda, implicit and explicit political views, and shifts in authorial tone and content over time. Covers all genres including film. 400 level is capstone for Japanese Studies major and thesis and oral presentation are required.


AS-450 Individualized Study-Tutorial
Individualized tutorial counting toward the minimum requirements in a major or minor, graded A-F.


AS-452 Individualized Study-Tutorial
Individualized tutorial not counting in the minimum requirements in a major or minor, graded A-F.


AS-453 Individualized Study-Tutorial
Individualized tutorial not counting in the minimum requirements in a major or minor, graded S/U.


AS-460 Individualized Study-Research
Individualized research counting toward the minimum requirements in a major or minor, graded A-F.


AS-462 Individualized Study-Research
Individualized Research not counting in the minimum requirements in a major or minor, graded A-F.


AS-463 Individualized Study-Research
Individualized research not counting in the minimum requirements in a major or minor graded S/U


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Course level: 100 | 200 | 300 | 400
CHN-101 Beginning Chinese
Introduction to the fundamentals of Chinese language (Mandarin)--speaking, listening, reading, and writing. The course focuses on interactive communication, essential grammatical structures, and basic vocabulary and usages. Students learn communicative skills regarding daily life, college activities, and basic social interaction. Students master approximately 700 characters.


CHN-102 Beginning Chinese
Introduction to the fundamentals of Chinese language (Mandarin)--speaking, listening, reading, and writing. The course focuses on interactive communication, essential grammatical structures, and basic vocabulary and usages. Students learn communicative skills regarding daily life, college activities, and basic social interaction. Students master approximately 700 characters. Prerequisite: Chinese 101 with a C- or better or placement.


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CHN-201 Intermediate Chinese
Continuation of beginning Chinese. The course further develops skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing with a rigorous training to improve aural-oral proficiency and to assure mastery of 800 additional characters. Upon completion of the course, students are able to talk about topics of personal interest and familiar social events, write short essays, and have a good command of 1,500 characters. Prerequisite: Chinese 102 with a C- or better or placement.


CHN-202 Intermediate Chinese
Continuation of beginning Chinese. The course further develops skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing with a rigorous training to improve aural-oral proficiency and to assure mastery of 800 additional characters. Upon completion of the course, students are able to talk about topics of personal interest and familiar social events, write short essays, and have a good command of 1,500 characters. Prerequisite: Chinese 201 with a C- or better or placement.


CHN-228 Business Chinese
Intermediate Chinese course focusing on the effective communication skills essential in professional fields and the understanding of the Chinese business world. Students develop their verbal, listening, reading, and writing proficiency in business Chinese and acquire culturally appropriate inter-personal communication skills needed to deal with a variety of business situations. Students are expected to effectively employ their language skills to explore and analyze current business trends and issues in China.


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CHN-301 Advanced Chinese I
Prerequisite: Chinese 202 with a C- or better or placement.


CHN-302 Advanced Chinese II
Prerequisite: Chinese 301 with a C- or better or placement.


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CHN-401 Advanced Chinese
Continuation of CHN302. This course develops the skill of reading a variety of authentic materials, ranging from literature, newspaper, magazine, film, to scholarly blogs. The topics include the social-cultural-economic phenomena and transformations in contemporary China. Students are also expected to develop their speaking and writing skills for high-level communicative tasks in Chinese, including rhetorical skills in speech and conducting formal presentations through well-articulated statements.


CHN-450 Individualized Study-Tutorial
Individualized tutorial counting toward the minimum requirements in a major or minor, graded A-F


CHN-460 Individualized Study-Research



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Course level: 100 | 200 | 300 | 400
JPN-101 Elementary Japanese
Introduction to the fundamentals of speaking, listening, reading and writing. Students master hiragana and katakana and learn basic Chinese characters as they are used to write Japanese. Students shop for various items, describe objects, use counters, ask prices, and hold basic conversations all in Japanese. The course also acquaints students with basic patterns, ritual greetings and phrases, and cultural aspects embedded within the use of language.


JPN-102 Elementary Japanese
Introduction to the fundamentals of speaking, listening, reading and writing. Students master hiragana and katakana and learn basic Chinese characters as they are used to write Japanese. Students shop for various items, describe objects, use counters, ask prices, and hold basic conversations all in Japanese. The course also acquaints students with basic patterns, ritual greetings and phrases, and cultural aspects embedded within the use of language.


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JPN-201 Intermediate Japanese
Extension of beginning Japanese. Building on the basics, the course emphasizes communication. Students learn to ask and give directions, use honorific and humble verbs, conduct interviews, and discuss family and work situations. Chinese characters (kanji) are introduced at a more rapid rate, and students are able to read and write simple texts and some authentic materials.


JPN-202 Intermediate Japanese
Extension of beginning Japanese. Building on the basics, the course emphasizes communication. Students learn to ask and give directions, use honorific and humble verbs, conduct interviews, and discuss family and work situations. Chinese characters (kanji) are introduced at a more rapid rate, and students are able to read and write simple texts and some authentic materials.


JPN-203 Advanced Intermediate Japanese
A language course to prepare students for a possible major or minor in Japanese Studies. The course presents grammar and vocabulary at a faster pace and in broader topics and situations than in the traditional intermediate language course, in order to obtain higher proficiency in both conversation and reading/writing. Also, the course introduces students to skills for beginning independent research and study of materials of their own interests in the field of Japanese Studies.


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JPN-301 Advanced Japanese
Continuation of intermediate course. The course refines and integrates skills learned in intermediate level to allow students to handle more complex communications and comprehend more advanced readings with an emphasis on reading and writing kanji.


JPN-302 Advanced Japanese
Continuation of intermediate course. The course refines and integrates skills learned in intermediate level to allow students to handle more complex communications and comprehend more advanced readings with an emphasis on reading and writing kanji.


JPN-303 Adv Reading, Comp & Conv
A focus on the development of speaking in honorific language, developing proficiency in reading journalistic style, and becoming more accurate in writing short essays. Discussions are based on advanced-level readings on contemporary issues. Readings include various essays, newspaper articles, and short stories. Students increase their ability to use more sophisticated expressions in both oral and written form.


JPN-304 Adv Reading, Comp & Conv
A focus on the development of speaking in honorific language, developing proficiency in reading journalistic style, and becoming more accurate in writing short essays. Discussions are based on advanced-level readings on contemporary issues. Readings include various essays, newspaper articles, and short stories. Students increase their ability to use more sophisticated expressions in both oral and written form.


JPN-305 Advanced Japanese : Contemporary Issues in Japanese Society
Study of selected themes in contemporary Japanese society and culture, through reading and discussion of contemporary debates in periodicals, news sources and other media. Readings will focus on such themes as work and social pressure, gender inequality, social alienation, declining birthrates, aging and social support, media images, and education. Conducted in Japanese.


JPN-306 Advanced Japanese: Discourse and Culture in Second Language Learning
Study of the significance of cultural knowledge in understanding the meaning of language. The course examines how language learners understand values, expectations and appropriate behavior in Japanese culture, as well as the theoretical underpinnings of pragmatics and discourse analysis.


JPN-308 Business Japanese
Advanced Japanese course focusing on the effective communication skills essential in professional fields and the understanding of the Japanese business world. Students develop their verbal, listening, reading, and writing proficiency in business Japanese and acquire culturally appropriate inter-personal communication skills needed to deal with a variety of business situations. Students are expected to effectively employ their language skills to explore and analyze current business trends and issues in Japan. Conducted in Japanese.


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JPN-450 Individualized Study-Tutorial
Individualized tutorial counting toward the minimum requirements in a major or minor, graded A-F


JPN-451 Individualized Study-Tutorial
Individualized tutorial counting toward the minimum requirements in a major or minor, graded S/U


JPN-452 Individualized Study-Tutorial
Individualized tutorial not counting in the minimum requirements in a major or minor, graded A-F


JPN-453 Individualized Study-Tutorial
Individualized tutorial not counting in the minimum requirements in a major or minor, graded S/U


JPN-460 Individualized Study-Research
Individualized research counting toward the minimum requirements in a major or minor, graded A-F


JPN-461 Individualized Study-Research
Individualized research counting toward the minimum requirements in a major or minor, graded S/U


JPN-462 Individualized Study-Research
Individualized research not counting in the minimum requirements in a major or minor, graded A-F


JPN-463 Individualized Study-Research
Individualized research not counting in the minimum requirements in a major or minor graded S/U


JPN-470 Individualized Study-Internship
Internship counting toward the minimum requirements in a major or minor, graded A-F


JPN-471 Individualized Study-Intern
Internship counting toward the minimum requirements in a major or minor, graded S/U


JPN-472 Individualized Study-Internship
Internship not counting in the minimum requirements in a major or minor, graded A-F


JPN-473 Individualized Study-Internship
Internship not counting in the minimum requirements in a major or minor, graded S/U


JPN-474 Summer Internship
Summer Internship graded A-F, counting in the minimum requirements for a major or minor only with written permission filed in the Registrar's Office.


JPN-475 Summer Internship
Summer Internship graded S/U, counting in the minimum requirements for a major or minor only with written permission filed in the Registrar's Office


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