Department Learning Outcomes

The Environmental Studies department has a rigorous curriculum that allows students to develop a sophisticated understanding of the environment. Our courses are in the Natural Sciences, Social Sciences and The Humanities—the Liberal Arts ethos is deeply ingrained throughout our curriculum. Our students acquire critical thinking and analytical skills through frequent hands-on experiences, such as fieldwork, study trips, and in-depth research projects. Collaboration with fellow students, faculty members, and decision makers is a key to the academic and future success of our students, who go on to succeed in a wide range of careers in academia, government, non-government organizations and business.

Upon completion of a major in Environmental Studies at Gettysburg College, students will be able to:

  1. Use an interdisciplinary approach that synthesizes information from the natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities.
  2. Demonstrate critical thinking, drawing from both quantitative and qualitative forms of analysis, that allow them to understand, analyze, and draw conclusions about local and global environmental issues.
  3.  Successfully conduct an environmentally themed research study that uses appropriate techniques drawn from the natural sciences, social sciences, or humanities.
  4. Communicate effectively in writing (e.g., research papers and essays), in oral presentations (e.g., research talks, debates), and in visual media (e.g., maps, figures, slides, posters, video, web-based communication).

 

Upon completion of a minor in Environmental Studies at Gettysburg College, students will be able to:

  1. Use an interdisciplinary approach that synthesizes information from the natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities.
  2. Demonstrate critical thinking, drawing from both quantitative and qualitative forms of analysis, that allow them to understand, analyze, and draw conclusions about local and global environmental issues.
  3. Communicate effectively in writing (e.g., class papers), in oral presentations (e.g., in-class presentations), and in visual media (e.g., maps, figures, slides, posters, film).