Bringing South Asia home

Bringing South Asia home

Megan SijapatiNepal is familiar territory for Prof. Megan Adamson Sijapati, who teaches courses on Islam, Hinduism and religious traditions of South Asia, religious conflict and cooperation, and religions in modernity.

She first traveled to Nepal in 1994 and has lived there several times, including in 2005-2006 as Fulbright Hays scholar and most recently in 2009-10. Her firsthand experiences have given her important insights into Nepal's Muslim minority, which has long been marginalized in the Hindu majority country. Sijapati's insights inform her newly published book, Islamic Revival in Nepal: Religion and a New Nation (Routledge, 2011).

Sijapati said her research and teaching share one goal: to help students see that "Islam, like any religion, is multidimensional and not monolithic," and that a huge portion of Muslim life is outside the Arab world and the Middle East.

She came to Gettysburg College from the University of California, Santa Barbara, where she completed her doctorate in religious studies with a focus on South Asian religions and Islam and an emphasis in global studies. Her doctoral dissertation examined movements in the Kathmandu valley and the local and global factors that affect them.