Planning for the Future

This ambitious plan is important for the future of the College, for the students who come here to learn, and for the world around us.

 Near the end of his second term as U.S. president, not long before he would return to his home in Gettysburg and become a Gettysburg College trustee, Dwight D. Eisenhower was discussing his accomplishments during his two terms in office. "People ask how it happened," he said. "By God, it didn't just happen, I can tell you that." It is in that same spirit that we are pursuing the strategic directions outlined here, to ensure that the future of Gettysburg College doesn't just happen, but that it happens intentionally, and that we are in full control of it. One part of taking control involves pursuing the goals described in this plan. Another important part involves assessing our progress, which we will accomplish through regular program reviews, data-driven analysis, benchmarking, and other means.

 In 1832, in his proposal to create what today is Gettysburg College, theologian Samuel S. Schmucker wrote that the new college promised "to exert a salutary influence in advancing the cause of liberal education." Through the strength and vitality of our academic and co-curricular offerings, our distinctive ability to engage students in learning, and our capacity for preparing young men and women of great intellect and character for leadership in all walks of life, we have experienced extraordinary success in fulfilling our founding promise.

Strategic Directions is designed to help us work from our unique strengths to achieve nothing less than the highest standards of excellence in liberal arts education. This ambitious plan is important for the future of the College, for the students who come here to learn, and for the world around us.