Employee Handbook Section Ten: EMPLOYEE STANDARD OF CONDUCT

General Standards of Conduct

To make the College a safe and pleasant place to work, every employee is expected to observe certain standards of conduct, which have been established in the best interest of our employees, our students, visitors, and the College.

Certain conduct is of such serious nature that immediate dismissal may be warranted without prior warning or discipline. Examples of such conduct are as follows: gross insubordination; dishonesty; stealing property or merchandise belonging to the College, its suppliers, students, or other employees; private financial relations with customers or suppliers; deliberate damage to College property; failure or refusal to carry out a work assignment; fighting; falsifying or causing to be falsified information on an employment application, time card, or other College documents; unlawful possession, use or distribution of alcohol; intoxication; the illegal use, sale, manufacture, possession or distribution of drugs or narcotics; sexual misconduct, other inappropriate sexual conduct, illegal harassment and/or discrimination; the possession or use of firearms or other weapons on College premises including in your own vehicles; or the use or threat of violence.

The specific conduct described in this section does not include all the grounds for discipline or discharge. These descriptions are intended as illustrations of the type of conduct that must be avoided for the good of our employees, our students, visitors, and the College.

Because these rules are essential to our most important function - high quality service to our students - and the efficient operation of our business, the provisions of this section will be promptly and uniformly enforced. We appreciate the cooperation of every employee in the careful observance of these standards of conduct.

Harassment and Discrimination-Free Workplace

Introduction

Gettysburg College is committed to maintaining an environment conducive to learning for all students and a professional workplace free from harassment and discrimination for its employees. Gettysburg College will not tolerate harassment or discrimination on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, age, religion, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, or any other trait or characteristic protected by any applicable federal, state, or local law or ordinance. Harassment or discrimination on the basis of sex or any other protected characteristic may affect the terms and conditions of employment or interfere with a student’s work or academic performance and create an intimidating or hostile environment for that employee or student. As such, harassment or discrimination on the basis of any protected trait or characteristic is contrary to the values of Gettysburg College, is a violation of College policy applicable to faculty, administration, and staff and is a violation of the Student Code of Conduct.

Section I: Employee and Student Sexual Harassment, Sexual Misconduct, Dating Violence, Domestic Violence, Stalking, and Sexually Inappropriate Behavior

All members of Gettysburg College have the right to work and study in an environment free of discrimination, including freedom from sexual harassment, sexual misconduct, dating violence, domestic violence, stalking and other sexually inappropriate behavior. The intent of this policy is to foster responsible behavior in a working and academic environment free from discrimination and harassment. Thus, Gettysburg College strongly disapproves of and forbids the sexual harassment of employees or students, and will not tolerate sexual assault, sexual misconduct, dating violence, domestic violence, stalking, and other sexually inappropriate behavior.

Sexual harassment, sexual misconduct, dating violence, domestic violence, stalking and other sexually inappropriate behavior as defined in Section II of this policy is prohibited when it involves any member of the campus community:

  • towards a faculty member or employee by a faculty member or employee
  • towards a student by a faculty member or employee
  • towards a faculty member or employee by a student
  • towards a student by a student
  • towards a faculty member or employee or student by a visitor or guest of the College.


All members of the faculty, administration and support staff who have information regarding, are witness to, or become aware of by any means any form of sexual harassment, sexual misconduct, inappropriate sexual behavior, dating violence, domestic violence, stalking and/or criminal activity, are required to report the incident. Information on how to make a report can be found below in Section IV, Reporting of Prohibited Conduct, Harassment and Discrimination Violations.

Section II: Other Forms of Harassment/Discrimination

Employees are expected to maintain the highest degree of professional behavior. All harassment or discrimination by employees is strictly prohibited. Further, harassing or discriminatory behavior of non-employees directed at College employees or students also is condemned and will be promptly addressed.

Discrimination occurs when race, color, national or ethnic origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, marital status, disability, religion, veteran status, age or any protected status is used as (inappropriate) irrelevant criteria for action. Discrimination is particularly condemned when it exploits and jeopardizes the trust that should exist among members of an educational institution. To preserve a work and study atmosphere that fosters such trust, the College affirms the principle that students, faculty, and staff must be treated equitably and evaluated on the basis of merit rather than irrelevant criteria. When a person intentionally or inadvertently abuses the power and authority inherent in his or her position, there can be negative consequences both to the individuals involved as well as to the educational and working environment of the College.

Discrimination also includes harassment. Harassment may be based on a person’s race, color, national or ethnic origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, marital status, disability, religion, veteran status, age or any protected status. It includes a wide range of abusive and humiliating verbal or physical behaviors that are directed against a particular person or persons. In some cases, the conduct may be such that it is clear that it is directed against a particular person or persons, even though the person(s) may not be explicitly identified.

Examples of unacceptable behavior include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • physical, emotional, or mental abuse
  • racial, religious, ethnic, or gender-based or sexual insults
  • derogatory ethnic, religious, or sexual jokes or slurs
  • unwelcome sexual comments or advances
  • taunting intended to provoke an employee
  • requests for sexual favors used as a condition of employment or affecting any personnel decisions such as hiring, promotion, or compensation
  • unwanted physical contact such as pinching, grabbing, rubbing, etc stalking, bullying, cyber-bullying, etc.

All members of the faculty, administration and support staff who have information regarding, are witness to, or become aware of by any means any form of harassment or discrimination are required to report the incident. Information on how to make a report can be found below in Section IV, Reporting of Prohibited Conduct, Harassment and Discrimination Violations.

Section III: Prohibited Conduct and Policy Definitions

In addition to discrimination, this policy prohibits “Sexual Misconduct” and “Relationship Violence,” broad categories encompassing the conduct defined below. Sexual Misconduct and Relationship Violence can be committed by anyone and can occur between people of the same or of different gender. For purposes of this policy, the various forms of prohibited Sexual Harassment are referred to as “Sexual Misconduct.”

Prohibited conduct includes:

Sexual Misconduct:

  • Sexual Harassment
  • Sexual Assault
  • Sexual Exploitation
  • Stalking
  • Retaliation
  • Complicity
  • Harassment, Harm to Others, and Harassing Conduct

Relationship Violence:

  • Domestic Violence
  • Stalking
  • Dating Violence/Intimate Partner Violence

Sexual Harassment

Sexual Harassment can be a single, serious incident or a series of related, repeated incidents. Sexual harassment is defined as unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature (verbal or physical conduct) when the conduct:

  • is reasonably perceived as creating an intimidating or hostile work, learning or living environment,
  • unreasonably interferes with, denies or limits someone’s ability to participate in or benefit from any educational program and/or activities,
  • submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual's employment,
  • submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as the basis for employment decisions affecting such individuals, or
  • such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual's work performance or creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive working environment.

In addition to the above, specific types of sexual harassment constituting violations of this policy include:

Sexual Assault: Having or attempting to have sexual intercourse or oral sex, without Consent. Sexual intercourse means anal or vaginal penetration by a penis, tongue, finger, or inanimate object.

Non-Consensual Sexual Contact: Any intentional sexual touching or attempted sexual touching, without Consent.

Sexual Exploitation: An act attempted or committed by a person for sexual gratification, financial gain, or other advancement through the abuse or exploitation of another person’s sexuality. Examples of sexual exploitation include, but are not limited to, non-consensual observation of individuals who are undressed or engaging in sexual acts, non-consensual audio- or video recording or streaming of sexual activity, prostituting another person, and allowing others to observe a personal consensual sexual act without the knowledge or consent of all involved parties.

Coercion: The use or attempted use of pressure and/or oppressive behavior, including express or implied threats, intimidation, or physical force such that the application of pressure or oppression causes the recipient of the behavior to engage in unwanted sexual activity. Coercion includes administering or pressuring another to consume a drug, intoxicant, or similar substance with the intent to impair that person’s ability to consent prior to engaging in sexual activity.

Complicity: Assisting, facilitating, or encouraging the commission of a violation of the Sexual Misconduct and Relationship Violence Policy.

Harm to Others: Physical violence including (but not limited to) physical abuse, assault, threats of violence, striking, shoving or subjecting another person to unwanted physical contact.

Harassing Conduct: Intentionally or recklessly endangering, threatening, or causing emotional harm to any person. This may also include causing physical damage to their property.

Harassment: Harassment includes any written, verbal or physical acts (including electronically transmitted acts) that is reasonably perceived as creating an intimidating or hostile work, learning or living environment, particularly if questionable behavior is repeated and/or if it continues after the offending party is informed of the objectionable and/or inappropriate nature of the behavior. Harassment can be a single incident, or a series of repeated incidents.

Sexually Inappropriate Behavior: Conduct that is rude, obscene or sexually suggestive gestures or communication. Public masturbation, disrobing or exposure of one’s self to another person without that person’s consent is one example. This may be an isolated occurrence.

Relationship Violence

Relationship Violence is a violation of this policy and is defined as:

Domestic Violence: Knowingly, intentionally, or recklessly causing or attempting to cause bodily injury, physical or sexual assault, abuse, placing another in reasonable fear of serious bodily injury, engaging in repetitive conduct toward a certain person that puts them in fear of bodily injury, restraining another’s liberty or freedom of movement, or stalking where such conduct is directed against the Complainant by an individual’s current or former spouse, household member, intimate partner or any other person from whom the Complainant is protected under federal or Pennsylvania law.

Pennsylvania law defines domestic abuse as knowingly, intentionally or recklessly causing bodily injury of any kind, causing fear of bodily injury of any kind, assault (sexual or not sexual), rape, sexually abusing minor children, or knowingly engaging in a repetitive conduct toward a certain person that puts them in fear of bodily injury. These acts can take place between family or household members, sexual partners or those who share biological parenthood in order to qualify as domestic abuse.

Stalking: Repeated acts or communications directed toward another person, including following the other person without proper justification, which places the other person in reasonable fear of bodily injury or causes substantial emotional distress.

For the purpose of this definition; course of conduct means two or more acts, including, but not limited to, acts in which the stalker directly, indirectly, through third parties, or by any action causes substantial emotional stress. Stress means significant mental suffering or anguish that may, but does not necessarily require medical or other professional treatment or counseling.

Intimate Partner Violence and Dating Violence: Causing or attempting to cause physical or emotional harm, sexual assault or abuse, placing another in reasonable fear of serious bodily injury, restraining another’s liberty or freedom of movement, or stalking, where such conduct is directed against the Complainant by someone with whom they have been in a romantic or intimate relationship. Dating violence can be a single event or a pattern of behavior that includes, but is not limited to, sexual or physical abuse.

Other Definitions

Alleged Victim: Any individual who has allegedly experienced an act or acts of Sexual Misconduct or Relationship Violence.

Alleged Offender: Any individual that is alleged to have committed an act or acts of Sexual Misconduct or Relationship Violence.

Complainant: An individual who invokes the College’s processes to determine whether this Policy has been violated. The Complainant is normally the Alleged Victim.

Complaint: A written statement submitted by the Complainant to the College for the purpose of initiating disciplinary proceedings under this Policy. This includes complaints submitted through the Community Concern Form.

Consent: Consent to engage in sexual activity must exist from beginning to end of each instance of sexual activity. Consent is demonstrated through mutually understandable words and/or actions that clearly indicate a willingness to engage in, and continue to engage in, a specific sexual activity.

Consent must be informed and voluntary. To give Consent, a person must be awake, of legal age, and have the capacity to reasonably understand the nature of their actions. Individuals who are physically or mentally incapacitated cannot give Consent. Some indicators that an individual is incapacitated due to intoxication may include, but are not limited to, vomiting, unresponsiveness, inability to communicate coherently, inability to dress/undress without assistance, inability to walk without assistance, slurred speech, loss of coordination, or inability to perform other physical or cognitive tasks without assistance.

Silence, without actions evidencing permission, does not demonstrate Consent. Where force or coercion is alleged, the absence of resistance does not demonstrate Consent. The responsibility of obtaining Consent rests with the person initiating sexual activity.

Consent to engage in sexual activity may be withdrawn by either person at any time. A previous or current dating or sexual relationship, by itself, is not sufficient to constitute Consent. Once withdrawal of Consent has been expressed, the sexual activity must cease. Consent is automatically withdrawn by a person who is no longer capable of giving Consent (due to falling asleep or passing out into a state of unconsciousness, for example).

Discrimination: Discrimination refers to the treatment or consideration of, or making a distinction in favor of or against, a person based on the group, class, or category to which that person belongs rather than on individual merit. Discrimination can be the effect of some established practice that confers privileges on a certain class or denies privileges to a certain class because of race, color, national or ethnic origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, marital status, disability, religion, veteran status, age or any protected status. Harassment is a form of discrimination and constitutes a violation of this Policy.

Investigator: Any College trained administrative official or person or persons appointed by the College who will be responsible for coordinating any investigations into an alleged violation of the Harassment and Discrimination Free-Workplace Policy.

Mandatory Reporters: Mandatory Reporters are persons who, as a result of their profession, may be aware of cases of abuse or violence. At Gettysburg College, all faculty, administrators, support staff and student staff (with the exception of professional health, counselors and pastoral counselors) are designated as mandatory reporters with regard to cases of suspected sexual assault/violence, sexual misconduct, and relationship violence. Suspected incidents need to be immediately reported to the Department of Public Safety (DPS). In the State of Pennsylvania, employees of institutions of higher learning who suspect incidents of child abuse (including incidents of suspected child sex abuse) must report such incidents to the Department of Public Welfare’s Child Line (800-932-0313), the police having jurisdiction, and to their supervisor.

Party or Parties: A term referring individually or collectively to the Complainant and/or Respondent.

Respondent: Any individual alleged to have violated this Policy and against whom a Complaint has been submitted.

Retaliation: Acts or attempted acts to retaliate or seek retribution against anyone who has reported Sexual Misconduct or Relationship Violence or who has participated (or is expected to participate) in any manner in an investigation or proceeding under this Policy. Prohibited retaliatory acts include, but are not limited to, intimidation, threats, coercion, or discrimination. Retaliation constitutes a violation of this Policy.

In dealing with complaints of harassment and/or discrimination, the College will protect the rights of all parties. The College’s commitment to eliminate harassment and/or discrimination from the workplace should not be viewed as a license for employees to engage in unfounded, frivolous, or vindictive actions that are not made in “good faith” in violation of the intent and spirit of this policy.

Title IX: Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972, 20 U.S.C. §§1681 et seq., and its implementing regulations, 32 C.F.R. Part 106, which prohibit discrimination on the basis of sex, gender identity, or gender expression in education programs or activities operated by recipients of federal financial assistance. Gettysburg College is required to comply with Title IX.

Victim: A person who has experienced sexual misconduct or relationship violence.

Witness: Any individual who has seen, heard, or otherwise knows or has information about a violation or attempted violation of this Policy. Witnesses are protected from retaliation, which includes retaliation from the Complaint, Respondent, or from another party or parties.

Section IV: Reporting of Prohibited Conduct, Harassment and Discrimination Violations

Any employee or faculty member who believes he or she has been a victim of any form of prohibited conduct, harassment or discrimination in any form should bring the matter to a Co-Director in the Human Resources Office and/or the Vice Provost. Alternatively, the individual may complete the on-line Community Concern Webform located at: www.gettysburg.edu/reportconcern.

All members of the faculty, administration and all support staff are required to report incidents of prohibited conduct, harassment and/or discrimination, including sexual harassment and gender discrimination, sexual misconduct, relationship violence and sexually inappropriate behavior, that they observe, that they are informed about, or of which they become aware by any means, to a Co-Director of Human Resources and/or the Vice Provost. Alternatively, the individual may complete the on-line Community Concern Webform located at: www.gettysburg.edu/reportconcern.

If you, or another individual, are in need of immediate assistance, please call the Department of Public Safety (DPS) at 717-337-6911 or the Gettysburg Police Department by calling 911. You should call DPS in the following circumstances:

  • The health, safety or well-being of any individual is in jeopardy
  • An individual is in need of immediate medical assistance
  • Criminal or questionable activity is in progress

For non-emergency reporting, all members of the community may also submit a concern using the Community Care Webform (www.gettysburg.edu/reportconcern). Information provided on this form will be sent to the appropriate College official for review and follow-up. Generally, this form is used for non-emergency information (incident of concern is not in progress) for the following types of incidents:

  • Bias incidents
  • Crime tips
  • Discriminatory Conduct
  • General student, employee or faculty concern
  • Hazing
  • Sexual assault, sexual harassment, sexual misconduct, or relationship violence
  • Child abuse - In the State of Pennsylvania, employees of institutions of higher learning who suspect incidents of child abuse (including incidents of suspected child sex abuse) must immediately report such incidents first to the Department of Public Welfare’s Child Line (800-932-0313), then to the police having jurisdiction, and then to their supervisor.

If you would like to speak directly with a trained member of the College community, you may also contact one of the individuals listed below (Names, Locations, Emails, phone #s):

Title IX Coordinator

Jane North, Executive Vice President and Title IX Coordinator, Third Floor, Pennsylvania Hall, jnorth@gettysburg.edu, 717-337-6011


Intake/Investigative Offices:

Athletics:

Dave Wright, Director of Athletics, Second Floor, Wright Building, dwright@gettysburg.edu, 717-337-6530.

Department of Public Safety:

Bill Lafferty, Assistant Dean of College Life/Executive Director of Public Safety, Second Floor, College Union Building, wlaffert@gettysburg.edu, 717-337-6321

Human Resources:

Regina Campo, Co-Director of Human Resources, First Floor, Pennsylvania Hall, rcampo@gettysburg.edu, 717-337-6207

Jen Lucas, Co-Director of Human Resources, First Floor, Pennsylvania Hall, jlucas@gettysburg.edu, 717-337-6211

Provost’s Office:

Jack Ryan, Vice Provost, Third Floor, Pennsylvania Hall, jryan@gettysburg.edu, 717-337-6822

Student Rights and Responsibilities:

Jennifer McCary, Director of Student Rights and Responsibilities, Second Floor, College Union Building, jmccary@gettysburg.edu, 717-337-6998.

Inquiries concerning the application of these policies may be referred to the Title IX Coordinator or to one of the offices identified above or to the Office for Civil Rights, United States Department of Education. For further information, visit http://wdcrobcolp01.ed.gov/CFAPPS/OCR/contactus.cfm for the address and phone number of the U.S. Department of Education office that serves your area, or call 1-800-421-3481.

Role of the Title IX Coordinator:

The Title IX Coordinator’s role includes providing leadership and direction in the following areas:

  • Coordinate Title IX efforts including the development, implementation, and monitoring of appropriate policies, procedures and practices designed to comply with federal and state legislation, regulation, and case law requiring the prompt and equitable resolution of all complaints pursuant to Title IX;
  • Provide direction and oversight for all activities of the Title IX program including consulting with relevant policy-making bodies and senior management team members for the purpose of advising, clarifying and identifying necessary action to eliminate sex and/or gender-based discrimination in all educational programs and activities, to ensure that access to facilities, opportunities, and resources are gender equitable throughout campus;
  • Provide oversight to the training effort on Title IX for students and employees (faculty, staff, and administrators), with specialized training for investigators/fact-finders;
  • Partner with stakeholders and engage the campus community in strategic efforts aimed at the prevention of sexual violence and other forms of sex and/or gender-based discrimination;
  • Oversee the intake and investigative process by ensuring that it is prompt, effective, and equitable. Appoint and supervise the Title IX investigators and oversee investigation efforts. Ensure provision of initial remedial actions; assure compliance with timelines; ensure delivery of appropriate notice of charge, notice of hearing, notice of outcome, duty to warn, and remedies, and ensure a repository for and source of institutional record-keeping;
  • Ensure the institution maintains an organizational file of all complaints, and other records regarding Title IX compliance, including annual reports of the number and nature of filed complaints and the disposition of said complaints, data collection, climate assessment, pattern monitoring; and
  • Serve as principal contact for government inquiries pursuant to Title IX.
  • Chair the institutional Title IX/Clery Committee.

Section V: Investigation of Reports

All concerns will be taken seriously and directed to an intake office of the College which will then inform the alleged respondent about the College’s policy regarding such behavior, and advise the respondent that retaliation is prohibited.

The College’s Title IX Coordinator will be notified of the claim. The Title IX Coordinator will determine to whom to assign the responsibility to investigate. The investigation will typically involve interviewing the individual who believes he/she has been harassed; interviewing the individual who has been accused; and interviewing any witnesses or those who are believed to have relevant information about the claim. The individual being accused generally has the right to know who has made an allegation against him/her. The supervisor of an employee making a claim and the supervisor of an employee being named in a claim may be notified of the claim, only if appropriate.

Review:

  • When the individual making a claim or the accused is a member of the faculty, the investigation will normally be assigned to the Provost Office. Generally, the Vice Provost will conduct the investigation with a Co-Director of Human Resources, meeting with the individual making the claim, the individual who has been accused, and any witnesses or those who may have relevant information. Any corrective action toward a faculty member will be determined based on procedures set forth in the Faculty Handbook.
  • When a claim involves an employee of the College other than a faculty member, the investigation will typically be assigned to a Co-Director of Human Resources. The Title IX Coordinator may delegate responsibility for the investigation to another member of the professional staff or person or persons authorized by the College as appropriate. Any corrective action toward a member of the professional staff will be based on standard College procedures. The College, in its sole discretion, makes disciplinary decisions.
  • Student complaints about a faculty member or another employee of the College will be reviewed by either the Vice Provost (in the case of a faculty member) and the Director of Student Rights and Responsibilities or a Co-Director of Human Resources (in the case of an employee).
  • Faculty or staff complaints about a student will be reviewed by the Vice President for Student Life and Dean of Students. The judicial procedures for sexual harassment grievances are outlined in the Student Code of Conduct.
  • Student complaints about other students will be reviewed and investigated per the Sexual Misconduct and Relationship Policy by the Director of Student Rights and Responsibilities. The judicial procedures for sexual harassment grievances are outlined in the Student Code of Conduct.

During the course of an investigation, the individual conducting the investigation may consult with or notify the College President; the Provost; the Vice President of College Life/Dean of the College; the Co-Director of Human Resources; the Executive Director of Public Safety; and/or another administrator or outside legal counsel as appropriate.

Confidentiality will be maintained throughout the investigation to the extent practical and consistent with the College’s need to undertake a full and impartial investigation. Only those with a business need-to-know will be involved in the investigation.

In cases involving an issue or concern outlined in Section I (Employee and Student Sexual Harassment, Sexual Misconduct, Dating Violence, Domestic Violence, Stalking, and Sexually Inappropriate Behavior) only, both the complainant and/or the respondent may have an advisor of their choice present during the investigation. The role of an advisor is to support the grievant/respondent, but the advisor may not represent the grievant/respondent during the investigation. The grievant/respondent may speak quietly with his or her advisor or request a short break in order to speak.

Employees questioned by the College during the course of an investigation are expected to provide their full cooperation. In turn, it is the expectation of the College that all those involved in an investigation, including the individual making the claim, the individual who has been accused, and any witnesses will be treated with dignity and respect during the course of the investigation.

If criminal conduct has been alleged, the claimant may elect to file a complaint with the appropriate authorities. The College will conduct its own investigation even if a criminal investigation occurs.

The College will normally conclude its investigation in a period of 60 days or less. In rare cases where the matter presents particular complexities or the unavailability of witnesses, the time period may be extended. All investigations will offer an equal opportunity for the accuser and the accused to present relevant witnesses and other evidence. At the conclusion of the investigation, appropriate administrators of the College will determine whether a violation of this policy occurred using a “preponderance of the evidence” standard. This means that, based on the totality of the evidence, harassment more likely than not occurred (not a “clear and convincing evidence” standard).

The individual making the complaint, as well as the alleged offender, will be apprised of the outcome of the investigation in writing. The College Grievance Procedure is available to employees after a determination has been made by the appropriate administrator as discussed above (as long as it meets one of the three grounds identified in the policy). Please see Section VIII for more information about the College Grievance Procedure.

If harassment or other violation is found to have occurred, immediate and appropriate action will be taken to stop the harassment or other violation, eliminate the hostile environment, prevent its recurrence, and remedy its effects. Any employee who the College determines has engaged in discrimination or harassment will be promptly and appropriately disciplined. Disciplinary measures may consist of actions including verbal warning, written warning, last chance agreement, suspension without pay, or possible termination of employment. Faculty disciplinary matters will be handled per procedures outlined in the Faculty Handbook.

Statement on Confidentiality

The College will take all reasonable steps to investigate and respond to the complaint consistent with any request for confidentiality or request not to pursue an investigation. However, its ability to do so may be limited based on the nature of the request by the Complainant.

If the Victim requests anonymity or that the College not pursue an investigation, the College must balance this request in the context of its responsibility to provide a safe environment for all College community members. In cases where the College cannot respect the wishes of the Victim, the College will consult with the Victim and keep them informed about the College’s course of action.

If the report of misconduct discloses an immediate threat to the College campus community, where timely notice must be given to protect the health or safety of the community, the College may not be able to maintain the confidentiality of the Alleged Victim or Alleged Offender’s identities.

The College will assess any barriers to proceeding, including retaliation, and in cases where informal or formal resolution will take place, the College will inform the Respondent that Title IX prohibits retaliation and the College will take strong responsive action to protect the Complainant.

The College will consult the Title IX Coordinator who is responsible for evaluating requests for confidentiality once the College is aware of alleged sexual violence.

Section VI: Interim Measures

Overview

During the investigation and prior to the final determination, the College may take appropriate Interim Measures to protect the parties involved. A Complainant or Respondent may request an Interim Measure or other protection or the College may impose Interim Measures at its discretion to ensure the safety of all parties, the College community, and/or the integrity of the process. These actions are not a presumption of responsibility for violation of the Standards of Conduct Policy. Interim measures may be imposed whether or not formal disciplinary action is sought by the Complainant or the College.

Types of Interim Measures

The College after consulting with the victim will determine which measures are appropriate to ensure the victim’s safety and equal access to employment:

  • Assistance in alternative College employment arrangements and/or changing work schedules, when possible
  • A “no contact” directive pending the outcome of an investigation. Such directives serve as notice to both parties that they must not have verbal, electronic, written, or third party communication with one another
  • Providing an escort to ensure that the employee can move safely across campus
  • Assistance identifying an advocate to help secure additional resources or assistance including off-campus and community advocacy, support and services
  • Issue a full, partial, or modified persona non grata (PNG) to the respondent if appropriate
  • Any other remedy that can be tailored to the involved individuals to achieve the goals of this policy

The College will work with victims to identify what interim measures are appropriate in the short term, and will continue to work collaboratively throughout the College’s process and as needed thereafter to assess whether the instituted measures are effective and, if not, what additional or different measures are necessary to keep the victim safe.

Section VII: Resources for Victims of Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, Sexual Assault & Stalking

Off-campus

While Gettysburg College attempts to offer a number of on campus resources, we encourage employees to go to the hospital for medical care, as the staff there is trained in evidence collection.

DPS can assist a victim who is seeking out a Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) at the Gettysburg Hospital Emergency Department. SANEs are trained to provide counseling, perform the examination to retrieve forensic evidence and screen the victim for pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections (STI).

Other off-campus resources are also available as listed below.

Gettysburg Hospital

717-334-2121

Survivors Inc.

717-334-0589

Mobile Crisis

866-352-0339

On-campus

Gettysburg College is committed to treating all members of the community with dignity, care, and respect. Gettysburg College recognizes that deciding whether to make a report and choosing how to proceed can be difficult decisions. Gettysburg College encourages any individual who has questions or concerns to seek the support of campus and community resources. These professionals can provide information about available resources, and procedural options, and assistance to both parties in the event that a report and/or resolution under this policy are pursued. Individuals are encouraged to use all available resources, regardless of when or where the incident occurred.

The Employee Assistance Program

1-800-673-2514 * Confidential Resource

Department of Public Safety

717-337-6911

Title IX Coordinator

717-337-6011

Pastoral Counseling

717-337-6280 * Confidential Resource

Sexual Misconduct Resource Site

www.gettysburg.edu/sexualmisconductresource

Human Resources

717-337-6202

Provost Office

717-337-6821

Confidential and Anonymous Reporting

Adams County, PA, which includes the borough of Gettysburg and surrounding area, has established an anonymous reporting protocol for victims of sexual assault. The purpose of this protocol allows Adams County, PA to develop an alternative to standard reporting procedures for sexual assault victims. If a sexual assault victim does not currently wish to involve police, there is still an option to have the forensic evidence collected in a timely manner. By providing victims with the opportunity to gather information, solidify their support system, and establish rapport with first responders, the county hopes to create an environment that encourages reporting, even for those victims who initially feel unable, unwilling or unsure about doing so. Victims choosing to have evidence collected while anonymously reporting the sexual assault can do so during the forensic exam at the Gettysburg Hospital. The Adams County District Attorney’s Office manages the anonymous reporting protocol.

Gettysburg College also provides an Employee Assistance Program (EAP) for use by employees. The EAP is available to provide full-time support staff employees assistance with such problems as sexual or physical abuse, depression, marital and relationship conflict, stress, grief, critical incident stress, anxiety, and other personal matters. All full-time employees, regardless of performance, are eligible. The contact number the EAP is listed above.

All information relating to an employee's EAP participation is strictly confidential. Only the EAP provider maintains EAP records. The EAP provider does not release specific information about an employee's use of EAP services, unless the employee gives his or her advance written consent.

Assistance for Victims: Rights & Options

Regardless of whether a victim elects to pursue a criminal complaint, the college will assist victims of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking and will provide each victim with a written explanation of their rights . In Pennsylvania, a victim of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault or stalking has the right to file a petition with the courts requesting a Protection from Abuse Order (PFA) which could include the following:

  • An order restraining the abuser from further acts of abuse;
  • An order directing the abuser to leave your household/place of residence;
  • An order directing the abuser to refrain from stalking or harassing you or other designated persons;
  • Other protections based on issues related to cohabitation, residency, employment, and child custody.

DPS will help put victims who are interested in pursuing a PFA in contact with local courts. Any employee who obtains a PFA from Pennsylvania or any reciprocal State should provide a copy to DPS. A Complainant may then meet with DPS to develop a Safety Action Plan, which is a plan for DPS and the victim to reduce risk of harm while on campus or coming and going from campus. This plan may include, but is not limited to: escorts, special parking arrangements, providing a temporary cellphone, etc. DPS will help facilitate the reporting of PFA violations to the local police.

While not the same as the PFA, the College can issue a No Contact Directive. This includes, but is not limited to, communication that is written, verbal, or physical. Written communication is understood to include all electronic means of communication; including, but not limited to, email, instant messaging and text messaging. Verbal communication is understood to include phone calls and voice mail messages. A "no contact" directive may include additional restrictions and terms.

Reporting to the Police: DPS will help facilitate the reporting of incidents of sexual assault and relationship violence to the Gettysburg Police Department should the Complainant desire to pursue potential criminal charges. The police may be notified directly of an incident of sexual assault or relationship violence if the assailant is not known or otherwise identified or should the circumstances surrounding the incident pose a continuing threat to the Complainant or larger campus community.

Section VIII: Additional information

The Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013

The Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) incorporated with the Campus Sexual Violence Elimination Act (Campus SaVE) requires crimes of domestic violence, dating violence and stalking incidents to be reported to campus security authorities or local police agencies.

Timely Warning Reporting Obligations

The College must, in a manner that is timely and will aid in the prevention of similar crimes, provide information to the campus community about Clery Act crimes that have been reported to campus security authorities or state or local police that are considered to represent a serious or continuing threat to the College community. These warnings, which the Department of Public Safety issues as “Campus Safety Alerts”, shall be issued in accordance with established institutional procedures. The alerts are generally written and distributed to the campus community by the Executive Director of Public Safety or a designee and they are reviewed and approved by the Dean of Students or a designee.

Campus Safety Alerts are usually distributed for the following crimes that occur on or in campus owned, controlled, leased, rented, or otherwise recognized property: arson, criminal homicide, and robbery. Incidents of aggravated assault and sex offenses are considered on a case-by-case basis, depending on the facts of the case and whether there is a continuing danger to the campus community. For example, if an aggravated assault occurs between two students who have a disagreement, there may be no on-going threat to other Gettysburg College community members and a Campus Safety Alert would not be distributed.

Campus officials not subject to the timely reporting requirement are those with official counseling responsibilities who were providing confidential assistance to a crime victim, such as pastoral counselors and professional counselors.

Ongoing Education and Awareness Programming

The College offers programs to faculty and employees to raise awareness about Title IX and the Violence Against Women’s Act.

  • Online Education through United Educators
  • New employee and new faculty orientation
  • Bystander intervention workshops

Section IX: Grievance Procedure

This College Grievance Procedure is available to employees and students after a determination has been made by a Co-Director of Human Resources and/or the Vice Provost, Title IX Deputy Coordinators, as discussed above.

Purpose

The College Grievance Procedure exists as a means to contest a determination that has been made regarding an alleged violation of the College’s Harassment and Discrimination-Free Workplace Policy. There are three grounds for which the College Grievance Procedure can be applied:

  1. The complainant or the respondent believes that the discipline/sanction imposed was inappropriate for the violation of policy for which he or she was found responsible;
  2. An error occurred during the investigative stage preventing either the complainant and/or the respondent a reasonable opportunity to prepare and present information to the investigator(s); or
  3. There is a discovery of new information that was not available at the time of the investigative process and could have affected the outcome of the matter.

What Categories of Grievance Are Not Covered by the College Grievance Procedure

The College Grievance Procedure does not apply to issues concerning compensation, classification, work standards, stated College policy, matters that are beyond the control or jurisdiction of the College, or any disciplinary matter or termination unless the employee believes that such actions were the result of unlawful discrimination or harassment.

Additionally, dismissal of a faculty member for cause, non-reappointment of a non-tenured faculty member, or tenure/promotion issues may not be addressed with the College Grievance Procedure. These faculty issues, which may be addressed using procedures found in the Faculty Handbook, are under the purview of the Faculty Grievance Committee, a faculty committee that is distinct from the College Grievance Committee created under this policy.

This is not a legal proceeding but a Gettysburg College community procedure created with the health and welfare of the College’s employees in mind. The College Grievance Procedure may be used freely without fear of retaliation, and the Co-Directors of Human Resources, working with the Vice Provost and/or the Director of Student Rights and Responsibilities, if appropriate, are available for assistance throughout the process.

Composition of the College Grievance Committee

Under this policy, Gettysburg College maintains a body called the College Grievance Committee. Members of this committee are appointed by the President of the College for terms of three years. The College Grievance Committee will be composed of three tenured faculty members, three administrators, and three support staff members. The Chair of the College Grievance Committee will be a tenured faculty member and may serve as one of the four voting members of a grievance hearing panel.

Grievance Process

  1. The employee must file a Notice of Grievance Form within seven (7) business days of the final determination with (1) the Co-Directors of Human Resources in the case where the grievant is an administrator or support staff member, (2) the Vice Provost in the case where the grievant is a faculty member, or (3) the Director of Student Rights and Responsibilities in the case where the grievant is a student employee. This form will ask the grievant to identify which of the three grounds (or combination of the three), referred to in the Eligibility discussion above, he or she seeks to have addressed. The grievant will be asked to make a formal statement outlining the specifics of his or her grievance . 

  2. Upon receiving the Notice of Grievance Form, the Co-Directors of Human Resources, the Vice Provost, or the Director of Student Rights and Responsibilities will forward the Notice to the Chair of the College Grievance Committee. From the appointed College Grievance Committee members, the Chair will select a hearing panel of an additional three members, including one staff member and one administrator. If a student is a party to the grievance, the student may request of the Chair of the College Grievance Committee that the hearing panel include one student appointed by the Director of Student Rights and Responsibilities from the student members of the Student Conduct Review Board. The Chair will endeavor to have male and female representation on the hearing panel.

  3. The hearing panel will meet to review the formal grievance within the context of the policy of the College Grievance Procedure. The hearing panel may decide on the basis of the written grievance that the challenge does not satisfy one of the three grounds for a grievance. In such cases, the hearing panel will promptly forward its decision to the Co-Directors of Human Resources, the Vice Provost, and/or the Director of Student Rights and Responsibilities, as appropriate.

  4. If and only if the hearing panel decides that one or more of the three grounds for a grievance are met, the hearing panel will promptly schedule a hearing. The hearing will not revisit the entire matter, but will be limited to addressing the grounds for the grievance. At this hearing, the burden of proof will be on the grievant to establish the foundation for the grievance with clear and convincing evidence. The hearing will be a closed meeting, including only those persons whom the hearing panel deems necessary to address the grounds for the grievance. Witnesses will be present only when their testimony is being taken.

  5. The grievant may have an advisor present. The grievant may choose any current faculty member, administrator, support staff member, or student who is not directly involved in the case to serve as his/her advisor. The role of an advisor is to support the grievant, but the advisor may not represent the grievant during the hearing. The grievant may speak quietly with his or her advisor or request a short break in order to speak. There will not be attorneys present for the parties.

  6. The hearing panel will make a recommendation concerning the allegations of the grievance based on a majority vote. When the hearing panel consists of four members, a clear majority is three. Promptly after the completion of the hearing, the grievant will be advised of the recommendation of the hearing panel. The hearing panel will also advise one or more of the following persons: the Provost, if the grievant is a faculty member administrator or support staff member; or the Vice President for College Life, if the grievant is a student. If one of these administrators is the complainant or the respondent in the original hearing, the hearing panel will advise the President of the College of its recommendation instead of that administrator. The hearing panel has no restrictions upon it as to what it may recommend: from a finding that the grievance is not established, to a reprimand, to further proceedings for dismissal of the employee.

  7. The administrator, who is advised of the outcome of the hearing as set forth in paragraph 6 above, will review promptly the recommendation of the hearing panel. This administrator, who is not bound by the recommendation of the hearing panel, will determine any resolution of the grievance, including a sanction, within the authority of his or her position. The decision of this administrator is final.

Consensual Sexual or Romantic Relationships

In General:  There are special risks in any sexual or romantic relationship between individuals in inherently unequal positions of authority, and parties in such a relationship assume those risks.  In the Gettysburg College context, such positions include (but are not limited to) teacher and student, supervisor and employee, senior faculty and junior faculty, advisor and advisee, coach and athlete, and the individuals who supervise the day-to-day student living environment and student residents.  Because of the potential for conflict of interest, exploitation, favoritism, and bias, such relationships may undermine the real or perceived integrity of the supervision and evaluation provided, and the trust inherent particularly in the teacher-student context.  They may, moreover, be less consensual than the individual whose position confers power or authority believes.  The relationship is likely to be perceived in different ways by each of the parties to it, especially in retrospect. 

Moreover, such relationships may harm or injure others in the academic or work environment.  Relationships in which one party is in a position to review the work or influence the career of the other may provide grounds for complaint by third parties when that relationship gives undue access or advantage, restricts opportunities, or creates a perception of these problems.  Furthermore, circumstances may change, and conduct that was previously welcome may become unwelcome.  Even when both parties have consented at the outset to a romantic involvement, this past consent does not remove grounds for a charge based upon subsequent unwelcome conduct.

With Students:  Amorous, dating, or sexual relationships between faculty or staff members, and students are impermissible when the faculty or staff member has professional responsibility for the student.  It is a violation of College policy and prohibited for a faculty or staff member to engage in an amorous, dating, or sexual relationship with a student whom he/she instructs, teaches, evaluates, coaches, supervises, or advises, or over whom he/she is in a situation to exercise authority in any way.  Entering into a romantic and/or sexual relationship with any student is outside the bounds of an employee’s assigned duties, and he/she may not be eligible for the College’s liability insurance protection should he/she incur civil or criminal liability as a result of his/her actions. 

At a college, the role of a faculty or staff member is multifaceted, including serving as intellectual guide, teacher, counselor, mentor and advisor; the faculty and staff member’s influence and authority extend far beyond the classroom or work place.   Consequently, the College believes that a sexual or romantic relationship between a faculty or staff member, and a student, even where consensual and whether or not the student would otherwise be subject to supervision or evaluation by the faculty or staff member, is inconsistent with the proper role of the faculty or staff member, and should be avoided.  Gettysburg College therefore very strongly discourages such relationships.  Entering into a romantic and/or sexual relationship with any student is outside the bounds of an employee’s assigned duties, and he/she may not be eligible for the College’s liability insurance protection should he/she incur civil or criminal liability as a result of his/her actions. 

With other employees:   Amorous, dating, or sexual relationships between faculty and staff members are impermissible when the faculty or staff member has supervisory or evaluative responsibility for the other.  It is a violation of College policy for a faculty or staff member to engage in an amorous, dating, or sexual relationship with a faculty or staff member whom he/she evaluates, supervises, or over who he/she is in a situation to exercise employment authority in any way.

The College believes that sexual or romantic relationships between faculty and staff members employed within the same department, even where consensual and whether or not the faculty or staff members would otherwise be subject to supervision or evaluation by the faculty or staff member, is inconsistent with the proper role of the faculty or staff member, and should be avoided.  Gettysburg College therefore very strongly discourages such relationships. 

Where such a relationship exists by virtue of marriage or partnership within the same department, the person in the position of greater authority or power will bear the primary burden of accountability, and must ensure that he or she does not exercise any supervisory or evaluative function over the other person in the relationship.  Recusal is required and the recusing party must also notify his or her supervisor, department chair or dean in writing, so that such chair, dean or supervisor can exercise his or her responsibility to evaluate the adequacy of the alternative supervisory or evaluative arrangements to be put in place.  The chair, dean or supervisor must implement the alternative supervisory or evaluative arrangement.  Administrators and support staff must notify the Human Resources and Risk Management Office in writing when recusal is required.   Faculty members must notify the Provost’s Office in writing when recusal is required.

Responsibility:  The Provost’s Office will respond to issues arising from this policy involving faculty members. The Human Resources and Risk Management Office will respond to issues arising from this policy involving administrators and staff members.

Whistleblower Policy and Reporting Process

Gettysburg College is committed to high standards in all business practices. All individuals representing Gettysburg College are expected to observe certain standards of conduct, which have been established in the best interest of our faculty, employees, students, visitors and the College. These standards are noted in the Faculty Handbook, Employee Handbook, and Student Rights and Responsibilities Handbook.

This policy is approved by the President's Council, overseen by the Whistleblower Oversight Representative(s) and is administered by the Designated Authorities.

Policy Statement:

  • Employees and students with a reasonable concern relating to illegal or dishonest activity or other misconduct involving the College's financial or business affairs, including the management of information, may file a Good Faith Report for investigation (as discussed more fully below under "Whistleblower Reporting Process").
  • The College will provide protection from retaliation for any whistleblower. Retaliation includes, but is not limited to, any form of intimidation, reprisal, or harassment. Any whistleblower who believes he/she is being retaliated against should contact a Designated Authority (see below). If retaliation is found to have occurred, immediate and appropriate action will be taken to stop the retaliation, prevent its recurrence, and correct its effects. The College may take disciplinary action (up to and including termination) against any employee who has engaged in retaliatory conduct in violation of this policy.
  • Confidentiality will be maintained throughout the investigation to the extent practical and consistent with the College's need to undertake a full and impartial investigation. If disclosure is considered necessary, the College will notify the Whistleblower.

Employment related concerns shall continue to be reported through normal channels such as an employee's direct supervisor or Co-Directors of Human Resources and Risk Management.

In addition to employment-based action for illegal or dishonest activity or other misconduct involving the College's financial or business affairs, including the management of information, students may also be subject to the provisions of the student code of conduct. The same set of circumstances filed in a Good Faith Report may also lead to code of conduct charges and sanctions if a student is found responsible for violating the student code of conduct. For more information, please see the Handbook for Student Rights and Responsibilities.

Whistleblower Reporting Process

If an employee or student has knowledge of or concern about illegal or dishonest activity or misconduct involving the College's financial or business practices including the management of information, the employee or student should prepare a written Good Faith Report and submit it to one of the following individuals (identified collectively as Designated Authorities):

Designated Authorities are:

  • Vice Provost
  • Co-Directors of Human Resources and Risk Management 
  • Director of Student Rights and Responsibilities

A Good Faith Report should contain factual information, including dates, names or any other information that can be corroborated to warrant an investigation. The report should list contact information for the individual submitting the report.

An employee who makes a complaint or charge must exercise sound judgment and act without malice to avoid baseless allegations or frivolous complaints. Any reports filed in good faith that prove to be unfounded will not be subject to any disciplinary actions. Any individual, however, who knowingly files a false or materially misleading report of illegal or dishonest activities or other misconduct involving the College's business or financial affairs, is subject to disciplinary action.

Good Faith Report Investigation Procedure

The whistleblower is not responsible, nor is the whistleblower the appropriate party for investigating the activity or for determining fault or corrective measures. All complaints received under this policy will be promptly, thoroughly, and impartially investigated.

Designated Authorities will advise one or more of the following persons, collectively referred to as the Whistleblower Oversight Representative(s)(WOR): the Provost, if the whistleblower is a faculty member; the Executive Vice President of the College, if the whistleblower is an administrator or support staff member; or the Vice President for College Life, if the whistleblower is a student. If one of these administrators is a whistleblower or subject of investigation, the President will provide oversight for the investigation.

In cases where the respondent is a student, only the processes and policies in the Handbook for Student Rights and Responsibilities will apply in determining if a violation of the student code of conduct has occurred. In addition, student respondents may be subject to employment-based action from Human Resources or their departmental employer which will follow the provisions of this policy and any employee manuals/handbooks. A joint inquiry may be conducted by HR and Student Rights and Responsibilities, however, the processes determining an outcome will operate independently from one another.

The Designated Authority receiving the Good Faith Report reviews the complaint, determines the level of investigation the complaint warrants, identifies the appropriate party to perform the investigation, determines if the facts do or do not support the complaint, and recommends any corrective actions. The Designated Authority will pass this recommendation on to the WOR who then authorizes appropriate corrective actions, if any. At the discretion of the WOR or the Designated Authorities, a Good Faith Report's status and resolution may be shared with Legal Counsel.

When investigating Good Faith Reports, the College will protect the rights of all parties. Subjects of any investigation are not to interfere with an investigation. Subjects will be notified and given an opportunity to respond to any evidence found by the investigation before the investigation is closed.

All investigation findings will be recorded and maintained by the Office of HumanResources according to legal counsel guidelines. Records from student code of conduct proceedings will be maintained in accordance with FERPA and College policy. At the conclusion of any investigation, the individual who submitted the report will be notified that the investigation has been completed and whether the Good Faith Complaint was determined to be founded or unfounded.

Questions regarding this policy should be directed to the Designated Authorities.

Confidentiality and Related Issues Regarding Student Records
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Ace of 1974 (FERPA)


The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA), as amended, is a federal law that governs how colleges and universities supervise and protect student records. FERPA: (1) assures access by students to their education records, (2) permits student review of those records for accuracy, (3) guarantees use of the records only for legitimate educational purposes, and (4) controls release and disclosure of such records. FERPA is not a records retention statute; it does not define what records a College must maintain but rather, it governs the confidentiality of, and access to, those records that are maintained. Additionally, FERPA does not require the disclosure of records to third parties, but sets forth what may be disclosed to certain external parties under certain circumstances.

What Records Are Included Within The Scope Of FERPA?

It is important that faculty and staff alike understand the broad scope of FERPA's mandates. FERPA protects "education records" which term is defined as records(in handwriting, print, computer media, video or audio tape, film, microfilm, and microfiche) maintained by the College or an agent of the College (including faculty members) that are directly related or personally identifiable to a student, except:

  1. A personal record kept by a faculty/staff member if it is kept in the sole possession of the maker of the records, used only as a memory aid, and is not accessible or revealed to any other person except a temporary substitute for the maker of the record. 
  2. An employment record of a student provided the record is used only in relation to the individual's employment with the College. 
  3. In most cases, records maintained by the Campus Security office. 
  4. Records maintained by the health or counseling services if the records are used only for treatment of a student and made available only to those persons providing the treatment. 
  5. Alumni records that contain information about a student after he or she is no longer in attendance at the College and that do not relate to the person as a student.

It should be noted that if the education record (i.e., the document) itself may not be disclosed under FERPA, then communication or dissemination of the contents of that record is also prohibited.

Under What Conditions May Education Records Or The Information Contained Therein Be Released Without Student Consent?

Other than as described in this paragraph, most information contained in an education record may be released outside the College only with the written consent of the student. The law permits the release of most education records without the prior consent of the student to agencies acting on behalf of the federal or state Department of Education, to law enforcement agencies or third parties with a valid subpoena, to parents if the student is financially dependent (as defined by the Internal Revenue Service), or to appropriate College personnel. College employees must demonstrate a legitimate educational interest to request protected information, as opposed to personal or private interest, and such a determination will be made on a case-by-case basis.

In addition to the foregoing circumstances, under FERPA the College reserves the right to make public at its discretion, without prior authorization, the following directory information: name, address (home, campus, and e-mail), telephone number, picture, date and place of birth, major field of study, participation in officially recognized activities and sports, weight and height of members of athletic teams,dates of attendance, degrees and awards received, and the most recent educational agency or institution attended. Any student wishing that such information about him/her not be released must notify the Office of Academic Advising.

What Rights Does A Student Have With Respect To His/Her Education Records?

The student has the right, on request to the appropriate College official, to review all materials that are in the student's education records (as defined above), except:

  • Financial information submitted by the student's parents;
  • Confidential letters and recommendations associated with admissions, employment or job placement, or honors, to which the student has waived rights of inspection and review; 
  • Education records containing information about more than one student, in which case the College will permit access only to that part of the record that pertains to the inquiring student.

Records covered by FERPA will be made available within forty-five days of the student's request.

The student also has the right to petition the College to amend or correct any part of the education record he/she believes to be inaccurate, misleading, or in violation of his/her privacy rights.

How Does FERPA Impact Me As A Faculty Member?


As described briefly above, most records directly related or personally identifiable to a student are "education records" to which FERPA applies. As a faculty or staff member you are an agent of the College. Thus, for the most part, other than a personal record maintained by you, that is kept in your sole possession, that is used only as a memory aid, and that is not accessible or revealed to any other person (except a temporary substitute for you), any document or information that you create or that is provided to you that contains information that is personally identifiable to one or more students, is an education record and is subject to FERPA's confidentiality, non-disclosure, and student (and often parent) access requirements.

You may not disclose to anyone, other than the student himself/herself or others at the College with a legitimate educational interest, any record or information directly related or personally identifiable to a student, unless it is directory information as defined above or unless you have the written consent of the student. Faculty members from whom students request a letter of recommendation should feel free to discuss the student's performance in class and any "directory information." Without the written consent of the student, however, the faculty member should not disclose any information beyond the foregoing. If you receive a request to provide information about a student, you should consult with the Provost's Office or the Office of Academic Advising.

If more than one student is referred to in a given record, any information not applicable to the requesting student must be redacted. That is, you may not share information regarding a student with other students (unless it is directory information as defined above).

You should also understand that your students, and oftentimes their parents, may request access to their education records at anytime.

It is worth noting that the penalty for a FERPA violation is the imposition of a sanction by the United States Department of Education upon the College (as an institution, not upon any individual who may be responsible for disclosing the information). Specifically, FERPA provides that, upon finding a violation of FERPA, the U.S. Department of Education can (1) withhold federal funding from the College; (2) issue a cease and desist order to require FERPA compliance; or (3) terminate a College's eligibility to receive federal funding. Thus, if a faculty or staff member inappropriately discloses or releases an education record or the information contained therein, the College could be subject to monetary sanctions imposed by the federal government.

Abusive Language

Profane and/or abusive language will not be tolerated.

Alcohol Policy

Employees should note the College's alcohol policy concerning consumption of alcohol by students: Gettysburg College does not encourage the use of alcoholic beverages by students. In compliance with current Pennsylvania laws, the College does not approve of the consumption of alcohol by students (or their guests) who are under the age of 21, on or off the campus.
For College events in which students are present, it is recommended that departments consult the College's Alcohol Policy Review and Advisory Board (APRAB) for guidance.

Campus Smoking Policy

There is extensive data within the scientific community that illustrates the harmful effects of secondhand smoke on non-smokers. In fact, the Environmental Protection Agency has classified second-hand smoke as a Class A carcinogen, a classification reserved for the most lethal environmental hazards, such as asbestos, benzene, formaldehyde and radon. Research has linked secondhand smoke to lung cancer, cardiovascular disease, asthma, bronchitis, pneumonia, middle ear infections, and nasal and eye irritation. The use of tobacco products is the leading cause of preventable illness and early death.

In an effort to promote a healthy, comfortable and productive work environment for the employees of Gettysburg College, the College has become a smoke-free workplace. Smoking in any form is prohibited inside all College-owned or leased buildings including both residential and non-residential buildings and all recognized student housing including fraternities. In addition, smoking is prohibited in any College-owned or rented vehicles. Individuals who choose to smoke must smoke outside and must stand at least 15 feet away from any campus building. For employees, the enforcement of this policy will rest with the individual supervisor in consultation with the Co-Directors of Human Resources and Risk Management. For students, enforcement of this policy will rest with the Office of College Life. Violations of this policy will result in disciplinary action for employees and students.

Information about tobacco cessation is available through the Human Resources and Risk Management Office.

Drug-Free Workplace and Drug-Free Campus

In compliance with the Federal Drug-Free Workplace Act, it is the policy of Gettysburg College to provide a work environment that is free from the use, sale, possession, or distribution of illegal drugs or the improper or abusive use of legal drugs or alcohol on Gettysburg College premises, and to require College or contract employees to perform all College-related job duties, either on or off the College premises, without the presence of illegal drugs or inappropriate legal drugs in their systems.

The objective of this policy is to ensure a safe, healthy, and work-efficient environment for Gettysburg College employees and the surrounding community.
We are concerned about the well-being of employees whose drug or alcohol use, abuse, or dependency may affect their job performance as well as the safety and well-being of co-workers. Gettysburg College will utilize every reasonable measure to maintain a drug and alcohol-free work environment.

Definitions:
• Illegal Drugs - Illegal drugs, for the purposes of this policy, include narcotics, hallucinogens, depressants, stimulants, other substances capable of creating or maintaining adverse effects on one's physical, emotional, or mental state, and controlled medication not prescribed for current personal treatment by a licensed medical professional, in a medical setting, to address a specific physical, emotional, or mental condition.
• Medication or Prescription Drugs - Medication or prescription drugs, for the purpose of this policy, are drugs that an individual may be taking under the direction of a licensed medical professional in a medical setting to address a specific physical, emotional, or mental condition.
• Supervisory Referral - A process whereby supervisors require an employee to seek appropriate referral services through the Employee Assistance Program (EAP).

Awareness: In order to meet the objectives of this policy, Gettysburg College will provide to all employees information about the effects of drugs and alcohol through educational efforts and about the availability of information and services through the Employee Assistance Program (EAP). Additionally, the College will educate and train its management and supervisors to identify problems and symptoms of drug and alcohol abuse.

Following are descriptions of the health risks associated with the use of illicit drugs and the abuse of alcohol:

Alcohol: Although moderate alcohol use can be a healthy life-style choice for many, it is America's most abused drug. Each year, alcohol contributes to over one third of all traffic fatalities, over half of fires and half of burn injuries, almost half of hypothermia and frostbite cases and about 20 percent of completed suicides.

Chronic, excessive use causes cirrhosis of the liver, heart disease, cancer, gastrointestinal disorders, pancreatitis, respiratory ailments, neurological and nutritional disorders.

Alcohol abusers risk two to six times the rate of the population at large for death from disease, accident or violence. Alcohol abuse is a major factor in child abuse, domestic violence, sexual assault and other crimes. Use during pregnancy is linked to early fetal death, decreased birth weight, increased infant mortality and Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.

Nicotine: Nicotine is contained in tobacco products, nicotine chewing gum/skin patches and snuff. Overdose results in dizziness, weakness, nausea, and in rare cases tremors and convulsions. It is particularly risky when used in combination with other drugs, which increase heart rate and blood pressure.

Smoking causes lung cancer, chronic lung disease, heart and vascular system diseases. Smokers develop thinner skin, possibly due to decreased blood supply, and often appear to age more rapidly than non-smokers.

Marijuana:Reactions to smoking marijuana depend on its strength, user expectations, mood, setting and other substances unknowingly mixed with the marijuana. It usually produces feelings of relaxation and mild euphoria, but an anxiety/panic reaction can also occur. Use results in cognitive impairment and perceptual distortions, making it very dangerous to drive or to operate machinery while under its influence.

Smoking marijuana increases heart rate, damages lungs and interferes with sex hormone production. Regular users can develop a psychological dependence on the drug. Heavy use in adolescence can interfere with the development of adequate social and coping skills necessary for dealing with normal frustrations and stresses of life. "Amotivational Syndrome" is characterized by lethargy, loss of interest in work, relationships , exercise and other key life components. Academic performance can be particularly adversely affected by marijuana use in students who have been diagnosed with Attention Deficit Disorder.

MDMA (Ecstasy):Although ecstasy users typically seek an increase in pleasurable sensations and emotional closeness with others, use can also result in anxiety, paranoia, and psychotic episodes. It appears that with repeated use, depression and memory loss may be significant and long-term. Research suggests that repeated use or use at high doses may be linked to permanent changes in levels of the neurotransmitter, Serotonin and brain activity. These changes may be more evident in women than men.

Ecstasy use has been associated with a number of deaths, especially in conjunction with intense physical exertion. Overdose, characterized by greatly increased body temperature, hypertension and kidney failure, is typical of a stimulant overdose. It has also been linked to liver failure. Early signs of overdose are jitteriness and teeth clenching.

Hallucinogens:The effects of hallucinogens (e.g. LSD, psilocybin mushrooms, peyote) are often unpredictable, depending on what the drug is "cut" with, the user's personality, mood, expectations and setting. Effects include disturbances in sensory perceptions, dilated pupils, increased heart rate, blood pressure and body temperature, sweating, loss of appetite, insomnia, dry mouth and tremors. Combining PCP-like drugs with alcohol or sedatives can be fatal. Mescaline (peyote) taken with stimulants can also be very dangerous.

Negative psychological reactions ("bad trips") are unpredictable and not uncommon. They may be mildly anxiety producing or terrifying. Sometimes they can unmask serious underlying psychiatric problems which may require long-term treatment. Flashbacks, in which a person experiences the drug's effects without taking it again, can occur for months afterwards. Chronic use can result in mental confusion, difficulty with abstract thinking, and impaired memory/attention span/ concentration.

Stimulants: Stimulant drugs include amphetamines (Dexedrine, "uppers") diet pills, caffeine (found in products such as "No Doze") and nicotine. Stimulant drugs are used relatively safely to medically treat overweight, mild depression, fatigue, narcolepsy and Attention Deficit Disorder.

When abused, stimulants are associated with exhaustion, irritability, heart and circulatory system damage (including cardiac arrest and strokes), mental fatigue and confusion, psychosis, convulsions, hallucinations, panic, dizziness, social withdrawal depression and increased suicidal risk. Abusers can become profoundly physically dependent.

Sedatives: Sedatives include barbiturates, Rohypnol, Valium, Librium and other benzodiazapams (e.g., Xanax), GHB, "date rape drugs".

Sedatives produce relaxation and at higher doses, lightheadedness, drowsiness, slurred speed and in coordination. Driving can be extremely dangerous. Overdoses, using combinations of sedatives or mixing sedatives with alcohol can be fatal. Rohypnol and GHB, the "predatory drugs", can be added to drinks to facilitate a sexual assault. GHB is easy to manufacture, difficult to detect in a drink and can be fatal. Anyone who feels weak, dizzy, lightheaded or confused after a drink should obtain medical help immediately.

Cocaine:
Cocaine is a short-acting, stimulant drug which induces short-lived euphoria and increased energy and alertness. Use results in increased motor activity, respiratory rate, blood pressure and body temperature. Cocaine use leads to impaired perception, coordination and reaction times. It also can cause mood changes, impulsive behavior, risk-taking, nervousness, and perceived decreased need for food and sleep.

Cocaine may initially appear to energize the body, but in fact depletes energy by using it up faster. Even small doses of relatively pure cocaine can be fatal by causing hypertension, seizures, convulsions, respiratory and cardiac arrest. Nicotine, when used with cocaine, increases risk for sudden death from cardiac arrest.

Long-term effects can include restlessness, extreme mood swings, insomnia, paranoia, malnutrition, dehydration, constipation, rapid tooth decay and difficulty urinating. Male impotence and reduced female sexual response can also occur.

Addiction develops rapidly, especially when smoked in the form of "crack" cocaine. After the initial euphoria wears off, the user begins to feel depressed. The user then uses more cocaine to offset the depression. Soon, frequent users need the drug just to feel normal.

Inhalants: Inhalants include nitrites, anesthetics (nitrous oxide), solvents, paints sprays and fuels(gasoline, glues). Risks are especially high with anesthetic agents and solvents which can cause cardiac arrhythmia/arrest and severe, sudden oxygen deprivation. Risks are compounded by the extreme flammability of some of these agents. These agents are also associated with accidents and suicides. A significant percentage of people who die from use, are first-time users. Inhalants are particularly dangerous when combined with alcohol, sedatives, and cold medicines.

Long-term use is associated with central nervous system damage, neurological damage and deficits in memory, attention and concentration.

Ketamine ("Special K"): Ketamine is an animal tranquilizer, sometimes used as a "club drug". It is a dissociative drug, in that the user may lose the normal sense of connection between body and mind. In its tablet, powder, or liquid form it is similar in appearance to cocaine and methamphetamine, and may be mistaken for those drugs. In powder form, it may be sprinkled on tobacco or marijuana and smoked. Or it may be injected. Large doses can lead to convulsions, brain damage, heart attack, stroke, coma, or death.

Sources: C Kuhn, S Swartzwelder, W Wilson, Buzzed: The Straight Facts About the Most Used and Abused Drugs, W. W. Norton and Company, 1998.

NIDA (National Institute for Drug Abuse) website: http://www.drugabuse.gov/NIDAHome.html

Prohibited Conduct (Drugs): Employees may not possess, use, purchase, sell, or transfer illegal drugs or controlled substances in any amount on College property(including parking lots), or in College vehicles (either owned by, leased to or used on behalf of the College), or while on College business or performing College-related duties on or off campus. Illegal drugs and substances are those which cannot be legally obtained, including controlled substances and controlled substance analogues,as well as those drugs which, although legal, have been illegally obtained (i.e.,prescribed drugs not being used for prescribed purposes or not being used by the intended recipient of the prescription, including amphetamines and barbiturates).Examples of illegal drugs include marijuana, cocaine, "crack", heroin, morphine, phencyclidine (PCP), hallucinogens, narcotics, etc.

Employees may not possess, use or consume illegal drugs or substances on or off College property during working hours, lunch periods, or break or relief periods.

Employees may not report to work "under the influence" of illegal drugs or substances.
Employees are prohibited from bringing drug paraphernalia onto College property(including parking lots) at any time.

Prohibited Conduct (Alcohol): Employees may not possess, use, purchase, sell, or transfer alcohol on College property (including parking lots), or in College vehicles (either owned by, leased to or used on behalf of the College), or while on College business or performing College-related duties on or off campus. An exception to this general rule is the responsible and legal use of alcohol at College sponsored events. The College does not take responsibility for the improper or illegal use of alcohol at such events.

Disciplinary Action: Any employee found to be in violation of this policy will be subject to disciplinary action that may include warning, immediate suspension, and up to and including termination. All such action requires the joint review and approval by the immediate supervisor and the Co-Directors of Human Resources and Risk Management. Any illegal substance confiscated will be turned over to the appropriate law enforcement agency for additional investigating and handling. Illegal substances include medication or prescription drugs not being used in accordance with a legitimate prescription.

Relapse by Employee: Any employee who is rehabilitated through the EAP must abide by the terms of any last chance agreement and/or the terms and conditions of the EAP program. Any relapse by an employee will be considered a violation of this policy and the employee will be subject to disciplinary action, up to and including termination.

Reporting Violations: As a condition of continued employment with this College, any employee convicted in court of any workplace violation of any criminal drug statute must report the conviction to the College no later than five (5) days after such conviction. An employee who fails to report such a violation is subject to disciplinary action, up to and including discharge.

Following is description of applicable legal sanctions under local, state, or federal law:

Pennsylvania Law/Borough Ordinances:
Underage drinking 18 Pa. C.S.A. 6308 This includes consumption, or transportation of alcoholic beverages. Penalties include fines from $300 to $500, 90 days to one year in prison, and 90-day to two-year driver's license suspension. Parents will be notified for those under 18.

Requesting or inducing a minor to obtain alcohol 18 Pa. C.S.A. 6310 Penalties include fines of not less than $300 up to $2,500 and/or up to one year in prison.

Knowingly making, altering, selling, or attempting to sell a false ID:18 Pa. C.S.A. 6310.2
Penalties include fines of not less than $1,000 and up to $5,000 and/or up to two years in prison.
Furnishing alcohol to minors (including allowing minors to possess alcohol on
premises owned or controlled by person charged) 18 Pa. C.S.A. 6310.1 Penalties include fines of not less than $1,000 up to $2,500 (can be per person served) and/or up to one year in prison.
Alcoholic Beverages ("Open Containers")
It is unlawful, within the Borough of Gettysburg, for any person to drink "liquor" or "malt or brewed beverages" upon any public street, municipal parking lot, private parking lot open for public use, or public park, or in any vehicle operated or parked thereon.
It is unlawful, within the Borough of Gettysburg, for any person to have in such person's possession, or in a vehicle under such a person's control, any open container containing "Liquor" or "malt or brewed beverages" upon any public street, municipal parking lot, private parking lot open for public use, or public park.
Noise Violations (Disorderly Conduct)
It shall be unlawful for any person to make unreasonable noise as to disturb, annoy or inconvenience any other person. Any noise includes, but is not limited to, noises caused by loud music, loud talking, yelling, barking dogs (etc.). The Gettysburg Borough Police Department has the right to issue citations on a single complaint from the public. A warning is not necessary if the Police Officer feels the citation is warranted.

  1. Following is a description of applicable counseling, treatment, rehabilitation, or re-entry programs1. 1. We want to encourage employees who think they may have a drug or alcohol dependency problem to seek help voluntarily through the Employee Assistance Program. The EAP may be accessed at www.wellspaneap.org; or by phone 1-866-227-6527.
  2. Local off-campus drug and alcohol assessment, treatment, and referral resources:

    • Adams-Hanover Counseling Services, 44 S. Franklin St. Gettysburg, PA 17325 -717-334-9111; Hanover 717-632-4900.
    • Pennsylvania Counseling Services: 334 York Street, Gettysburg, PA 17325, 717-337-0026.
    • Wellspan Behavioral Health: 40 V-Twin Drive Suite 202, Gettysburg, PA 17325, 717-337-2257.
  3. There are also a number of drug/alcohol related self-help groups, which meet regularly in the area. For a listing, contact Counseling Services, 337-6960.