Media coverage

Education prof. published op-ed with Philly.com


Education professor Dave Powell recently published on op-ed about the impact of changing test regulations within the state of Pennsylvania with Philly.com.

From Philly.com:

I’m personally not all that concerned about the shenanigans Pennsylvania’s Department of Education engages in as it tries to convince some invisible, but obviously very influential, constituency that demonstrating our testing prowess is the key to securing our children’s future. Maybe China is watching, waiting to find out if the Americans are actually serious about competing in the 21st century. Maybe the Germans are waiting with bated breath to assess our creditworthiness and only need to be assured that we have instituted desperately needed education reforms to sleep more soundly at night. Surely somebody out there cares that we’re doing this.

That doesn’t mean we should be too concerned with these results. It doesn’t really matter to me what a passing score is on the Pennsylvania System of School Assessment (PSSA), as long as I can be certain that people are not misusing the “data” produced by these tests to do exactly the opposite of what they claim to be doing.


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Civil War Institute prof. publishes op-ed with PennLive


Associate Director of the Civil War Institute Jill Ogline Titus recently published an op-ed with PennLive. In the op-ed, Titus argues in favor of restoring the Voting Rights Act.

From PennLive:

Two years ago, the Supreme Court determined that voter discrimination is a thing of the past. The Court's decision to gut the 1965 Voting Rights Act ensures that this summer's 50th anniversary commemoration is an ironic one.

We needed the legislation in 1965, the Court argued in its 2013 decision in Shelby County v. Holder, which struck down the formula that made the act enforceable, but we don't anymore.

In the two years since Shelby County, our chronically-divided Congress has struggled to put forward an effective response to the Court's ruling. Bills have been introduced, but failed to gain traction, due in large part to obstruction by ranking Republicans.


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Philosophy prof.'s book reviewed in Scientific American


Scientific American recently reviewed philosophy professor Steven Gimbel's book, Einstein: His Space and Times.

From Scientific American:

Einstein renounced religion at the age of 12, when he decided his Jewish beliefs were incompatible with the analytical mind-set of his truer devotion, science. Yet the world never stopped seeing him as a Jew, and over time he became a champion for his oppressed people and a supporter of the Zionist cause. “Einstein had alienated himself from the larger Jewish community, but the times forced him to realize that his heritage was an inalienable part of who he was,” writes philosophy professor Gimbel in this look at Einstein's relationship to Judaism and his political activism.


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Gettysburg College makes The Active Times ranking


In a ranking of "Fittest" colleges conducted by The Active Times, Gettysburg College was ranked 15 out of 50 schools.

From Athletic Times:

What exactly makes a college “fit”? Well, just as you would determine a person's level of fitness, we take a handful of different factors into consideration when setting out to name America’s “fittest” colleges.

Do students have easy access to a variety of athletic activities and facilities? If so, does a large portion of the student body regularly put them to use? What’s the campus dining situation like? Are students generally happy? What’s the overall quality of life like on campus?

These are just a few of the questions we ask as we set out to rank our list of the 50 fittest colleges each year.


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Executive Director of Communications published by Inside Higher Ed


Executive Director of Communications Paul Redfern '00 wrote an op-ed that was published by Inside Higher Ed. The op-ed focused on best practices for working with an advisory board or council.

From Inside Higher Ed:

Advisory councils and boards come with the territory for chief marketing officers. They are key constituents and some of your best brand ambassadors. Even when they may be your sharpest critics, your board members are your institution’s true believers. A CMO should seek — and welcome — the opportunity to interact with them.

The more open and transparent you are when asking for advice from your board or council, the more constructive and useful the information you get back will be.

If your board meetings are anything like ours at Gettysburg College, they take a good amount of preparation and follow-up. As I write this, I have our spring meetings in my rearview mirror and my sights set on the fall series.


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Yahoo news re-publishes Hamilton review by The Atlantic


Yahoo news republished a review of the play Hamilton written by The Atlantic which quotes Civil War era studies professor Allen Guelzo.

From Yahoo news:

Go to any American elementary school and ask the students to name the Founding Fathers, and it’s likely that Thomas Jefferson will come up, right alongside George Washington and Benjamin Franklin. Jefferson wrote the Declaration of Independence. Jefferson is on the nickel. Jefferson’s face is one of the four on Mount Rushmore. Jefferson has his own monument in Washington, D.C. Jefferson got to be president.

But Jefferson’s star may be fading. Democrats are erasing his name from political dinners because of his slave-owning history. Abraham Lincoln, almost everyone’s favorite president, “hated Thomas Jefferson,” a Gettysburg College professor explained this summer. After the independent historian Henry Wiencek published a controversial book criticizing the Virginian in 2012, The New York Times called Jefferson “The Monster of Monticello.”


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College prof. quoted in Hamilton Review by The Atlantic


In a review of Hamilton published by The Atlantic, Civil War era studies prof. Allen Guelzo about Lincoln's abhorrence of Alexander Hamilton. The play is a re-imagining of early American history and casts Alexander Hamilton in one of the antagonists.

From The Atlantic:

Go to any American elementary school and ask the students to name the Founding Fathers, and it’s likely that Thomas Jefferson will come up, right alongside George Washington and Benjamin Franklin. Jefferson wrote the Declaration of Independence. Jefferson is on the nickel. Jefferson’s face is one of the four on Mount Rushmore. Jefferson has his own monument in Washington, D.C. Jefferson got to be president.

But Jefferson’s star may be fading. Democrats are erasing his name from political dinners because of his slave-owning history. Abraham Lincoln, almost everyone’s favorite president, “hated Thomas Jefferson,” a Gettysburg College professor explained this summer. After the independent historian Henry Wiencek published a controversial book criticizing the Virginian in 2012, The New York Times called Jefferson “The Monster of Monticello.”


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