Media coverage

Grads' wedding announcement published in the New York Times


The wedding announcement of Michele Seabrook '13 and Benjamin Streeter '13 was published by the New York Times, along with a narrative of their relationship.

From the New York Times:

Michele Bowden Seabrook, the daughter of Lorraine M. Seabrook and Jack C. Seabrook of Hopewell, N.J., was married Friday evening to Benjamin Michael Streeter, a son of Leslie D. Varela of Capbreton, France, and a stepson of the late Stéphane Varela de Seijas. The Rev. Andrew Costello, a Roman Catholic priest, performed the ceremony at St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Annapolis, Md.

The couple met at Gettysburg College, from which they graduated.

The bride, 23, is the communications manager for the Education Finance Council in Washington.

The groom, 30, works in Washington as an associate editor at Stateline, an online daily newsletter run by the Pew Charitable Trusts that covers state policy issues. Until June 10, he was a copy editor with The Hill, a political newspaper and website, also in Washington.


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Guelzo quoted in the New York Times over Confederate flag debate


In an article published by The New York Times, Director of Civil War Era Studies Allen Guelzo shares his thoughts on the Confederate flag debate.

From the New York Times:

Lowering the Confederate flag from public properties is thus an easy call. There are plenty of ways to celebrate Southern heritage and Southern life without choosing one so enmeshed in the fight to preserve slavery.

The harder call concerns Robert E. Lee. Should schools and other facilities be named after the great Confederate general, or should his name be removed and replaced?

The case against Lee begins with the fact that he betrayed his oath to serve the United States. He didn’t need to do it. The late historian Elizabeth Brown Pryor demonstrated that 40 percent of Virginia officers decided to remain with the Union forces, including members of Lee’s family.

As the historian Allen Guelzo emailed me, “He withdrew from the Army and took up arms in a rebellion against the United States.” He could have at least sat out the war. But, Guelzo continues, “he raised his hand against the flag and government he had sworn to defend. This more than fulfills the constitutional definition of treason.”


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2015 Alum gives stole of gratitude to high school, receives media attention


Robert Shaw Bridges '15 gave his stole of gratitude to his high school, Villa Maria High School, in order to fulfill a Gettysburg College Commencement tradition. The action was publicized in his hometown paper.

From Greenwich Time:

Villa Maria in Stamford welcomed its former student, Robert Shaw Bridges, last week when he returned to the school to present them with his “stole of gratitude” from Gettysburg College. Students are required to wear the stole at the college’s commencement as a symbol of their appreciation for the individuals and organizations whose support was instrumental in helping them graduate, after which they are encouraged to present their stole to the person or organization that most influenced their academic career.


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Allen Guelzo hosted on WITF to discuss the Confederate flag debate


Director of Civil War Era Studies Allen Guelzo was hosted on WITF's Smart Talk Radio to discuss the national debate surrounding the Confederate flag.

From WITF:

It began when nine African-Americans were shot and killed in a South Carolina church.  Police say the alleged killer was motivated by racial hatred.  Photographs went public of him waving a Confederate flag, which to many is a symbol of racism.

Thousands responded by calling for South Carolina to remove the Confederate flag from its state capitol grounds.  After Republican Gov. Nikki Haley agreed, other Confederate flags and symbols of the Confederacy were targeted for removal.

Those who claimed the flag represents southern heritage and history seem outnumbered. 

Dr. Allen Guelzo, who is Henry R. Luce Professor of the Civil War Era and Director of Civil War Era Studies at Gettysburg College appears on Friday's Smart Talk with a unique point-of-view on the Confederate flag.


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Executive Director of Communications mentioned on Inside Higher Ed


In a follow up to his most recent post on Inside High Ed, Executive Director of Communications and Marketing Paul Redfern '00 was mentioned in a round-up of communications professionals addressing the complexities of the field.

From Inside Higher Ed:

Higher ed is complex and marketing and communications doesn’t escape this reality. Developing or implementing an integrated marketing and communications strategy is complicated.

My colleagues on Call To Action have already written about issues two and three…


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Alum writes blog post for American Historical Association


In a blog post for the American Historical Association, Elizabeth Elliot '13 reflects on the career choices of her fellow history majors.

From the American Historical Association:

To help history students adapt to the changing job market, the AHA has begun a new series on searching for jobs and developing careers. In this post, AHA’s Elizabeth Elliott checked in with her fellow Gettysburg College history graduates to see what careers they have pursued.

Two years ago, I graduated with a BA in history from Gettysburg College in Pennsylvania. History is one of the college’s 10 most popular majors, in part because of the campus’s close proximity to a major historical site, Gettysburg National Military Park. During my time as a student, I came to know individuals who passionately wanted to devote their lives to academic or public history, as well as those who enjoyed the subject but had no plans to pursue it professionally.

To help history students adapt to the changing job market, the AHA has begun a new series on searching for jobs and developing careers. In this post, AHA’s Elizabeth Elliott checked in with her fellow Gettysburg College history graduates to see what careers they have pursued.

Two years ago, I graduated with a BA in history from Gettysburg College in Pennsylvania. History is one of the college’s 10 most popular majors, in part because of the campus’s close proximity to a major historical site, Gettysburg National Military Park. During my time as a student, I came to know individuals who passionately wanted to devote their lives to academic or public history, as well as those who enjoyed the subject but had no plans to pursue it professionally.

- See more at: http://blog.historians.org/2015/06/past-graduates-ba-history-now/#sthash.r4BOYD0P.dpuf

To help history students adapt to the changing job market, the AHA has begun a new series on searching for jobs and developing careers. In this post, AHA’s Elizabeth Elliott checked in with her fellow Gettysburg College history graduates to see what careers they have pursued.

Two years ago, I graduated with a BA in history from Gettysburg College in Pennsylvania. History is one of the college’s 10 most popular majors, in part because of the campus’s close proximity to a major historical site, Gettysburg National Military Park. During my time as a student, I came to know individuals who passionately wanted to devote their lives to academic or public history, as well as those who enjoyed the subject but had no plans to pursue it professionally.

- See more at: http://blog.historians.org/2015/06/past-graduates-ba-history-now/#sthash.r4BOYD0P.dpuf

To help history students adapt to the changing job market, the AHA has begun a new series on searching for jobs and developing careers. In this post, AHA’s Elizabeth Elliott checked in with her fellow Gettysburg College history graduates to see what careers they have pursued.

Two years ago, I graduated with a BA in history from Gettysburg College in Pennsylvania. History is one of the college’s 10 most popular majors, in part because of the campus’s close proximity to a major historical site, Gettysburg National Military Park. During my time as a student, I came to know individuals who passionately wanted to devote their lives to academic or public history, as well as those who enjoyed the subject but had no plans to pursue it professionally.

- See more at: http://blog.historians.org/2015/06/past-graduates-ba-history-now/#sthash.r4BOYD0P.dpuf

To help history students adapt to the changing job market, the AHA has begun a new series on searching for jobs and developing careers. In this post, AHA’s Elizabeth Elliott checked in with her fellow Gettysburg College history graduates to see what careers they have pursued.

Two years ago, I graduated with a BA in history from Gettysburg College in Pennsylvania. History is one of the college’s 10 most popular majors, in part because of the campus’s close proximity to a major historical site, Gettysburg National Military Park. During my time as a student, I came to know individuals who passionately wanted to devote their lives to academic or public history, as well as those who enjoyed the subject but had no plans to pursue it professionally.

- See more at: http://blog.historians.org/2015/06/past-graduates-ba-history-now/#sthash.r4BOYD0P.dpuf

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Incoming first-year talks about college decision


In an article published by his hometown paper, A.J. Gentile '19 discusses why he chose Gettysburg to continue his education and football career:


From The Northern Valley Suburbanite:

One of the main things that attracted former Cougars multi-sport star A.J. Gentile to Gettysburg College was the course of study he plans to pursue.

"I liked the business program," he said, "[especially] the OMS (Organization Management Studies). They also have great alumni connections and jobs out of college."

Gentile chose Gettysburg over Franklin & Marshall, Muhlenberg, Union and a couple of others as the school where he will continue his football career.

"The campus is gorgeous, they have new facilities and the football coaches are great," he added.


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