Programs and Resources

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Exposure Control Program

The Exposure Control Program is the written guide for Gettysburg College compliance to 29 CFR 1910.1030, “Occupational Exposure to Bloodborne Pathogens.” All employees at Gettysburg College who are identified as having a “reasonably anticipated” risk of exposure to blood or other potentially infectious materials are required to comply with this document.

The primary objective of this document is to provide a general guide to minimize all exposures to bloodborne pathogens. The Exposure Control Plan establishes the basic safety principles for procedures, equipment and work practices that are capable of protecting employees from the hazards of bloodborne pathogens. This document is intended only to highlight those safety measures necessary for achieving a safe and healthy work environment. Where the scope of hazards is not adequately addressed by this general document, supervisory personnel must develop specific Standard Operating Procedures.

Contact Director David Taylor at dtaylor@gettysburg.edu for questions or a copy of this program.

Bloodborne Pathogens Training

Bloodborne Pathogens Training is part of the Exposure Control Program. Those employees identified in the program as an affected employee must complete annual training. The training is currently done at the beginning of each year for existing employees or at the beginning of employment throughout the year.

Contact Director David Taylor at dtaylor@gettysburg.edu for questions or a copy of this program.

Confined Space Program

The Confined Space Program identifies confined spaces on the college property and provides guidelines for classification of spaces as well as entry procedures. This program is for both contactors who work on campus as well as campus employees who are authorized to enter these spaces.

Contact Director David Taylor at dtaylor@gettysburg.edu for questions or a copy of this program.

Contractor Manual

Gettysburg College expects all work to be perform in a safe manner. This means that all employees, vendors, and contractors must think and act safety at all times while on Campus.

This manual establishes campus workplace safety requirements for vendors and contractors while on Gettysburg College property. It also serves as our "game plan" to avoid workplace injuries and illnesses and reach required loss control objectives. The philosophy of Gettysburg College dictates that loss control be incorporated as a significant part of the education structure and is essential to the protection of our employees, students, guests and property.

Every person working for a vendor or contractor on the college property must know, understand and comply with ALL safety rules, policies and procedures as outlined, including all federal, provincial and local regulations that apply to the work being performed. Each company, person(s) is/are expected to have their own OSHA written programs and trained employee(s) to perform the 1910 and 1926 of the Federal Code of Regulations. Changes and/or additions may be made to those rules as it is necessary for the health and safety of our employees, contractors, visitors, and students.

Contact Director David Taylor at dtaylor@gettysburg.edu for questions or a copy of this program.

Ergonomics

Gettysburg College has instituted an Ergonomic Guidelines to help improve employee health and safety. The Ergonomic Guidelines are in accordance with 29 CFR 1910 Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Proposed Ergonomic Protection Standard, Federal Register, March 20, 1995.

Ergonomics is the science of fitting workplace conditions and job demands to the capabilities of the working population. Effective and successful "fits" assure high productivity, avoidance of illness and injury risks, and increased satisfaction among the workforce. Although the scope of ergonomics is much broader, the term here refers to assessing those work-related factors that may pose a risk of musculoskeletal disorders and recommendations to alleviate them.

Common examples of ergonomic risk factors are found in jobs requiring repetitive, forceful, or prolonged exertions of the hands; frequent or heavy lifting, pushing, pulling, or carrying of heavy objects; and prolonged awkward postures. Vibration and cold may add risk to these work conditions. Jobs or working conditions presenting multiple risk factors will have a higher probability of causing a musculoskeletal problem. The level of risk depends on the intensity, frequency, and duration of the exposure to these conditions and the individuals' capacity to meet the force of other job demands that might be involved.

Contact Director David Taylor at dtaylor@gettysburg.edu for questions or a copy of this program.

Fall Protection

The Fall Protection Program in accordance with OSHA 29 CFR 1910 and 1926 establishes basic safety principles and work practices that are capable of protecting employees who are performing general industry work above 4 feet or construction work above 6 feet at Gettysburg College. This document is intended only to highlight those safety measures necessary for achieving a safe and healthy work environment.

Contact Director David Taylor at dtaylor@gettysburg.edu for questions or a copy of this program.

Hearing Conservation Program

The Hearing Conservation Program serves as the written guide for Gettysburg College compliance to 29 CFR 1910.95, titled, “Occupational Noise Exposure” and the Hearing Conservation Program (HCP) requirements contained therein. All employees at Gettysburg College whose job duties expose them to noise levels exceeding the permissible exposure limits set by OSHA in 29 CFR 1910.95, are required to comply with this document.

Contact Director David Taylor at dtaylor@gettysburg.edu for questions or a copy of this program.

Energy Control Lockout Tagout Program

The Energy Control Program provides guidelines for shutting down a machine or equipment that has no potential for stored or residual energy or accumulation of stored energy after shut down which could endanger employees. Stored energy can be electrical, thermal, hydraulic, mechanical, chemical or gravity.

Contact Director David Taylor at dtaylor@gettysburg.edu for questions or a copy of this program.

Personal Protective Equipment Program

The Personal Protective Equipment Program serves as the written guide for Gettysburg College compliance to 29 CFR 1910.132, titled, “Personal Protective Equipment” and the personal protective equipment program requirements contained therein.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) require employers to protect their employees from workplace hazards such as machines, work procedures, and hazardous substances that can cause injury. The preferred way to do this is through engineering controls or work practice and administrative controls, but when these controls are not feasible or do not provide sufficient protection, an alternative or supplementary method of protection is to provide workers with personal protective equipment (PPE) and the know-how to use it properly.

Contact Director David Taylor at dtaylor@gettysburg.edu for questions or a copy of this program.

Respiratory Protection Program

The Respiratory Protection Program serves as the written guide for Gettysburg College compliance to 29 CFR 1910.134, titled, “Respiratory Protection” and the Respiratory Protection Program requirements contained therein.

Respirators are to be used only when engineering controls (e.g. enclosure or confinement of the operation, general and local ventilation, and substitution of less toxic materials) are not feasible, while these controls are being installed or repaired, or in emergencies

Contact Director David Taylor at dtaylor@gettysburg.edu for questions or a copy of this program.

Hot Works Program

Welding and Hot Work, such as brazing or grinding present a significant opportunity for fire and injury. All precautions described in this program must be applied prior to commencing any welding or hot works by college employees and/ or contractors. Welding, cutting and use of torches shall comply with this section, NFPA 51B and OSHA 29 CFR 1910.252.

Examples of Hot Works: Cutting, Brazing, Soldering, Thawing Pipes, Torch Applied Roofing, Grinding and Welding.

Contact Director David Taylor at dtaylor@gettysburg.edu for questions or a copy of this program.