Alumni and faculty teach and conduct research as Fulbright Scholars around the world

Use the interactive map below to learn more about the last ten years of Fulbright scholarships connected to Gettysburg College.

Amanda Pellowe ’12 remembers exactly how she felt earlier this year when she learned that she earned a Fulbright Scholarship to study in Norway, focusing on the role of nanoparticles in allergic responses to titanium, a metal used in artificial joints.

“My favorite memory is the moment I found out that I got the Fulbright. I was overwhelmed with feelings of relief, excitement, pride, and nervousness. I had a hard time focusing for the rest of the day,” Pellowe said.

Pellowe, who was a biochemistry and molecular biology major at Gettysburg College, is working at the Haukeland University Hospital in the biomaterials lab, which is affiliated with the University of Bergen. Her research, “orthopedic implant induced immune responses,” means that Pellowe studies the immune reactions caused by metallic wear debris from orthopedic implants.

Amanda Pellowe“The short term goal is to help develop a more accurate way to test titanium sensitivity, and the long term goal is to develop an understanding of how these allergic reactions occur,” Pellowe said. While working with researchers at the University of Bergen, she is also taking classes.

Though a member of the most recent class of Fulbright Scholars at Gettysburg College, Pellowe joins a long line of students who have earned the scholarship, allowing them to begin studying shortly after graduation. Faculty members can also apply to the Fulbright Program and many from Gettysburg College have received a Fulbright, greatly enhancing their scholarship and teaching.

The interactive map above marks the last ten years of Fulbright Scholars associated with Gettysburg College in the countries where they have studied, beginning with 2002. View photos from past Fulbright scholars on Flickr.

History Prof. Bill Bowman is one of those from the Fulbright class of 2002. His Fulbright sponsored a stay at the research institution Internationales Forschungszentrum Kulturwissenschaften (International Research Center for Cultural Studies) in Vienna, Austria.

“While there, I was a Fellow working alongside scholars from many different nations and representing several different disciplines. Our primary purpose was to conduct our own research, but we also had to make occasional formal and informal presentations, and we attended a wide range of academic talks and conferences sponsored by the IFK. I conducted research on the history of medicine in 19th- and 20th-century Austria, which formed the basis for two scholarly articles that I later published,” Bowman said.

Fulbright scholarships are prestigious grants from the U.S. Department of State's Fulbright Program, which support research, learning, and teaching in more than 155 countries worldwide. In 2010 and 2011, The Chronicle of Higher Education named Gettysburg College a top producer of students who receive grants from the Fulbright Program.

Bowman had the opportunity to pay the Fulbright experience forward when he worked with Marc Fialkoff ’10 on his application as a student.

Fialkoff, who majored in political science, received one of the new United Kingdom Partnership Awards to select institutions within the U.K. He also received the Fulbright/Leeds Award - the only one offered to Leeds University by Fulbright in 2010. This program brings together the Institute for Transport Studies and the Sustainability Research Institute facilitating Fialkoff's study of the relationship between transport policy and the environment.

“The experience was amazing – studying in England and traveling around the country conducting my research at British ports was great. My Fulbright year was a once in a lifetime experience, which I could not have done without Gettysburg College,” Fialkoff said. Fialkoff is currently attending Roger Williams School of Law in Bristol, R.I., which offers a specialization in maritime law.

Austria Wilson FulbrightEnvironmental Studies Prof. Randy Wilson, who received a Fulbright in 2011 to study in the Department of English and American Studies at the University of Vienna in Austria, summed up the experience echoed by many Fulbrighters.

“To gain meaningful insights into another culture, there is absolutely no substitution for living in another country for an extended period of time. A Fulbright Fellowship is one of those rare opportunities for a faculty member to gain such an experience,” Wilson said.

Wilson found that his research on national forest management and rural development in the Rocky Mountain West connected clearly with Austrian scholars who are working on similar themes in the Alps. He says it led to new insights and future collaborations that have greatly enriched his research.

And while Pellowe has several more months researching allergic responses to titanium and much more in Norway, she has already discovered a tangible point of impact that Fulbright will have on her future.

“I am applying for Ph.D. programs in the United States, and it’s such a great feeling to be able to check the Fulbright Program box on my applications. A few schools have already contacted me, saying that they would hate to miss out on an application from a Fulbright. This is just one example of how the Fulbright scholarship opens up opportunities for participants. But, what I value most, are the cultural and academic experiences I’m gaining, and the network of intelligent people that I work with,” Pellowe said.

Founded in 1832, Gettysburg College is a highly selective four-year residential college of liberal arts and sciences with a strong academic tradition. Alumni include Rhodes Scholars, a Nobel laureate, and other distinguished scholars. The college enrolls 2,600 undergraduate students and is located on a 200-acre campus adjacent to the Gettysburg National Military Park in Pennsylvania.

Posted: Fri, 12 Oct 2012


Next on your reading list

The 3% Conference: alum ignites spark for increasing female creative leadership


What's next for the Class of 2015?


Fighter pilot turned teacher: Kevin Finan ’69 shares his passion for flying


Share this story: