The Civil 
War Institute

300 North Washington Street
Campus box 435
Gettysburg, PA 17325
P: 717.337.6590
F: 717.337.6596

Faculty

2016 Civil War Institute Faculty:
Reconstruction & the Legacy of the Civil War


Michael T. Bernath is the Charlton W. Tebeau Associate Professor of History at the University of Miami.  He teaches courses on the Civil War, the Old South, antebellum reform movements, and 19th-century intellectual and cultural history. He has published several scholarly articles for the Journal of Southern History, The Journal of the Civil War Era, and the Georgia Historical Quarterly.  He is the author of Confederate Minds: The Struggle for Intellectual Independence in the Civil War South (University of North Carolina Press, 2010).  He is currently working on a book about the experiences, perceptions, and reception of northern men and women who lived and worked as teachers in the South during the antebellum era.

David Blight is the Class of 1954 Professor of American History at Yale University and the Director of the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition. He is the author and editor of numerous books, scholarly articles, essays and annotated historical works, including the award-winning American Oracle:  The Civil War in the Civil Rights Era (Harvard University Press, 2011), the multi-award-winning A Slave No More: Two Men Who Escaped to Freedom, Including their Narratives of Emancipation (Harcourt, 2007), and Beyond the Battlefield: Race, Memory, and the American Civil War (University of Massachusetts Press, 2002).  In 2001, Dr. Blight published Race and Reunion: The Civil War in American Memory (Harvard University Press), for which he received eight awards, including the Bancroft Prize, the Abraham Lincoln Prize, the Frederick Douglass Prize, and the Merle Curti prizes for intellectual and social history. Supplementary to his academic work, Dr. Blight has served as a consultant on numerous documentary films and as an active board member and advisor to several public history sites, museums, and scholarly institutions across the nation. He lectures widely in the U.S. and around the world on the Civil War and Reconstruction, race relations, and problems in public history and American historical memory, and teaches summer institutes for both secondary teachers and for park rangers and historians in the National Park Service.   His most recent work, a biography of Frederick Douglass, was published by Simon and Schuster in 2015.

Keith Bohannon is an Associate Professor of History at the University of West Georgia, where he teaches courses in 19th-century U.S. history, the Civil War and Reconstruction, the American South, and Georgia history.  He is the co-editor of A Georgian With “Old Stonewall” in Virginia: The Letters of Ujanirtus Allen, Company F, 21st Regiment, Georgia Volunteer Infantry (Louisiana State University Press, 1998), and numerous scholarly essays.

James Broomall is the Director of the George Tyler Moore Center for the Study of the Civil War and an Assistant Professor of History at Shepherd University.  His research focuses on the intersection of gender and emotions, as well as the lasting psychological effects of war. He earned his Ph.D. in 2012 from the University of Florida, where he completed a dissertation entitled “Personal Confederacies: War and Peace in the American South, 1840-1890.”  Dr. Broomall also holds an M.A. in Museum Studies from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.  In addition to publishing several scholarly articles, Dr. Broomall is the co-editor of Rethinking American Emancipation: Legacies of Slavery and the Quest for Black Freedom  (Cambridge University Press, 2015) with William Link.  He is currently revising his dissertation for publication as a full-length book.

Thomas Brown is a Professor of History at the University of South Carolina, where he teaches courses in U.S. history, the Civil War and Reconstruction, cultural history, and intellectual history.  He is the author of Civil War Canon: Sites of Confederate Memory in South Carolina (University of North Carolina Press, 2015), and has edited and co-edited several other books, including Hope and Glory: Essays on the Legacy of the 54th Massachusetts Regiment (University of Massachusetts Press, 2001), and Remixing the Civil War: Meditations on the Sesquicentennial (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2011). He is currently completing a book entitled The Reconstruction of American Memory: Civic Monuments of the Civil War.  In addition to his academic work, Dr. Brown has also spent many years working closely with the Historic Columbia Foundation on the interpretation of the Woodrow Wilson Family Home.

Peter S. Carmichael is the Director of the Civil War Institute and the Robert C. Fluhrer Professor of Civil War Studies at Gettysburg College. He earned his Ph.D. from Pennsylvania State University, and currently teaches courses at Gettysburg College on the Civil War and Reconstruction, the American South, and public history.  He is the author of numerous scholarly articles, essays, and two books: Lee’s Young Artillerist: William R.J. Pegram (University of Virginia Press, 1998), and The Last Generation: Young Virginians in Peace, War, and Reunion (University of North Carolina Press, 2005). Dr. Carmichael has lectured widely on topics pertaining to the Civil War and public history, and has appeared as an expert scholar in several historical documentaries.  He has also conducted numerous public presentations, teacher workshops, exhibit consultations, and multiple interpretive workshops for National Park Service staff, in addition to assisting with the development of the student internship program at numerous NPS sites.  He is currently working on a cultural history of Civil War soldiers entitled The War for the Common Soldier, which is under contract with the University of North Carolina Press.

Catherine Clinton is an International Professor of U.S. History at Queen’s University, Belfast and the Denman Endowed Professor in U.S. History at the University of Texas, San Antonio.  She specializes in U.S. women’s history, southern history, African American history, and the American Civil War.  Dr. Clinton also serves as the series editor for “Viewpoints on American Culture,” published by Oxford University Press.  Her numerous publications include: The Plantation Mistress: Woman’s World in the Old South (Pantheon, 1982), Harriet Tubman: The Road to Freedom (Back Bay Books, 2004), a new edition of Susie King Taylor’s Reminiscences of My Life in Camp: An African-American Woman’s Civil War Memoir (University of Georgia Press, 2006), Battle Scars: Gender and Sexuality in the American Civil War (Oxford University Press, 2006, a volume co-edited with Nina Silber), Mrs. Lincoln: A Life (Harper Collins, 2009), and a newly edited volume of Mary Chesnut’s Diary (Penguin, 2011).

Abigail Cooper is an Assistant Professor of History at Brandeis University, where she teaches courses in 19th-century U.S. history, the American South, American religious history, cultural history, and the Civil War and Reconstruction.  She received her Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania.  Her current research examines the role of religion in slave contraband camps across the South during the Civil War.

Emmanuel Dabney is the park curator at Petersburg National Battlefield in Petersburg, Virginia. He holds a B.A. in Historic Preservation from the University of Mary Washington and an M.A. in Public history from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.  He maintains the blog Interpretive Challenges.

Michael DeGruccio is an Assistant Professor of History at Saint Peter’s University, where he teaches 19th-century U.S. history and Latino American history.  He received his Ph.D. from Notre Dame University in 2007 after completing a dissertation entitled “Unmade: Manhood and Self-Making in the American Civil War.”  Dr. DeGruccio is the author of several scholarly essays, including “Letting the War Slip through Our Hands: Material Culture and the Weakness of Words in the Civil War Era,” in Weirding the War: Stores from the Civil War’s Ragged Edges, a book of essays edited by Stephen Berry (University of Georgia Press, 2011). His research focuses on gender and family in 19th-century America and the Civil War era. 

Gregory Downs is an Associate Professor of History at the City University of New York, City College, where he teaches courses on 19th-century American history, the American South, slavery, the Civil War, Reconstruction, the Gilded Age, and the Progressive Era.  His research focuses on 19th-century U.S. political and cultural history and the transformative impact of the Civil War.  He is the author of Declarations of Dependence: The Long Reconstruction of Popular Politics in the South, 1861-1908 (University of North Carolina Press, 2011) and most recently, After Appomattox: Military Occupation and the Ends of War (Harvard University Press, 2015), which uses the lens of occupation to examine the immediate period after Confederate surrender as an extension of wartime.

James Downs is an Associate Professor of History at Connecticut College, where he teaches courses on the history of slavery and emancipation, the Civil War and Reconstruction, the history and politics of racism, environmental history, health history, and the American South.  His research examines the history of race and medicine in the 19th century. He recently published Sick from Freedom: African-American Illness and Suffering During the Civil War and Reconstruction (Oxford University Press, 2012), which tells the largely unknown story of the many former slaves who died at the moment of freedom.  Dr. Downs has also published on the representations of slavery in museums and historic landmarks in the United States, England, and the Bahamas.  Dr. Downs is currently working on two book projects—the first on the international outbreak of the 19th-century cholera epidemics, and the second on the history of sexuality.

Carole Emberton is an Associate Professor of History at the University at Buffalo.  She teaches classes in 19th-century U.S. history, the Civil War & Reconstruction, southern history, slavery, historical memory, women’s and gender history, African- American history, and the history of race.  Her publications include Beyond Redemption: Race, Violence, and the American South After the Civil War (University of Chicago Press, 2013), and “Only Murder Makes Men: Reconsidering the Black Military Experience,” (Journal of the Civil War Era, 2012) which was awarded the best article prize for 2012 by the JWCE.  Her current project, tentatively entitled A Folk History of Freedom, examines the complex and controversial testimonies of ex-slaves collected by the Federal Writers’ Project in the 1930s and their political implications in the decades leading up to the Civil Rights Movement.

Jared Frederick is an Instructor of History at the Pennsylvania State University at Altoona.  He holds a Masters degree in History, with a concentration in Public History, from West Virginia University.  In addition to working as a seasonal Park Ranger at Gettysburg National Military Park, Mr. Frederick has been an active writer and blogger.  He maintains the blog History Matters and is the owner of History Matters Publications, a press that specializes in historical art and books.

Barbara Gannon is an Assistant Professor of History at the University of Central Florida, where she teaches classes on military history, the Civil War and Reconstruction, and African American history. Her recent work, The Won Cause: Black and White Comradeship in the Grand Army of the Republic (University of North Carolina Press, 2011), won the 2012 Wiley-Silver Prize from the University of Mississippi’s Center for Civil War Research, and was a finalist for the 2012 Gilder Lehrman Lincoln Prize.

Sarah Gardner is a Professor of History and the Director of Southern Studies at Mercer University, where she teaches classes in 19th-century U.S. history, the Civil War and Reconstruction, southern history, and African American history.  Her work examines the cultural and intellectual history of the American South during the late-19th and early 20th centuries.  Dr. Gardner is the author of Blood and Irony: Southern White Women’s Narratives of the Civil War, 1861-1937 (University of North Carolina Press, 2004), and most recently, Reviewing the South: The Literary Marketplace and the Making of the Southern Renaissance (under review at Cambridge University Press).  She is also the Associate Editor of Voices of the American South (Longman Green, 2004). She is currently working on an intellectual history of the Reconstruction-era South.

Judith Giesberg is a Professor of History at Villanova University, where she teaches classes in 19th-century U.S. history, U.S. women’s history, Civil War and Reconstruction, and the history of childhood.  She is the author of several books and scholarly articles, including Civil War Sisterhood: The United States Sanitary Commission and Women’s Politics in Transition (Northeastern University Press, 2000) and Army at Home: Women and the Civil War on the Northern Home Front (University of North Carolina Press, 2009).  She is also the co-editor of Emilie Davis’s Civil War: The Diaries of a Free Black Woman in Philadelphia, 1863-1865 (Pennsylvania State University Press, 2014).

Lesley Gordon is a Professor of History at The University of Akron, where she teaches courses in the Civil War and Reconstruction, war and society, and the early republic.  Her publications include: General George E. Pickett in Life and Legend (University of North Carolina Press, 1998), Intimate Strategies of the Civil War: Military Commanders and their Wives (Oxford University Press, 2001), and This Terrible War: The Civil War and its Aftermath (Longman, 2003).  She is also the author of several articles and more than 60 book reviews. She is presently the editor of the scholarly journal Civil War History.  Dr. Gordon’s latest book, A Broken Regiment: The 16th Connecticut’s Civil War, was published in 2014 by the Louisiana State University Press.

Christopher Gwinn is the Supervisory Ranger for the division of Interpretation and Education at Gettysburg National Military Park. A member of the Gettysburg College class of 2006, Gwinn holds an M.A. in Public History, and has worked extensively for the National Park service at sites such as Antietam National Battlefield, Boston National Historical Park, and the National Mall and Memorial Parks.

Scott Hancock is an Associate Professor of History and Africana Studies at Gettysburg College.  His research focuses on the African American experience from the mid-seventeenth century to the Civil War, and examines how African Americans’ engagement with the law shaped constitutional law, legal ideologies, black identity, and U.S. society. His work has appeared in the anthologies Paths to Freedom, We Shall Independent Be, Slavery, Resistance, Freedom, and most recently, the scholarly journal Civil War History.

D. Scott Hartwig is a Civil War historian, battlefield guide, guest lecturer, and author of numerous articles, essays, and books.  A thirty-four year veteran of the National Park Service, Mr. Hartwig served as the Supervisory Historian at Gettysburg National Military Park for twenty-nine years, and won the 1993 Freeman Tilden Award for Excellence in Interpretation.  He has also appeared numerous times on the History Channel, Discovery Channel, and Pennsylvania Cable Network.  Mr. Hartwig is the author of To Antietam Creek: The Maryland Campaign of 1862 (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2012). He is currently working on a sequel to that book which will cover the battle of Antietam, its aftermath, and the end of the Maryland Campaign.

Charles J. Holden is a Professor of History at St. Mary’s College of Maryland, where he teaches classes in 19th- and 20th-century U.S. history, the American South, the Great Depression, and the New Deal.  He is the author of In the Great Maelstrom: Conservativism in Post-Civil War South Carolina (University of South Carolina Press, 2002), and The New Southern University: Academic Freedom and Liberalism at UNC (The University Press of Kentucky, 2012).

Ian Isherwood is the Assistant Director of the Civil War Institute at Gettysburg College.  He also teaches courses in British history, World War I, and war and memory, and serves as the academic coordinator for the Civil War Era Studies minor at Gettysburg College.  A 2000 graduate of Gettysburg College, Dr. Isherwood received his Ph.D. from the University of Glasgow in 2012.  He has published several scholarly articles and is currently working on a book entitled Remembering the Great War: Writing and Publishing the Experience of WWI, which is under contract with I.B. Tauris.

Caroline Janney is Professor of History at Purdue University, where she teaches courses on U.S. history and Civil War memory. She is the author of Burying the Dead But Not the Past: Ladies Memorial Associations and the Lost Cause (University of North Carolina Press, 2008), and most recently, Remembering the Civil War: Reunion and the Limits of Reconciliation (University of North Carolina Press, 2013), which was awarded the Charles S. Sydnor Award from the Southern Historical Association and the Jefferson Davis Award from the American Civil War Museum. The author of numerous scholarly articles and essays, Dr. Janney is also the co-editor with Gary W. Gallagher of Cold Harbor to the Crater: The End of the Overland Campaign (University of North Carolina Press, 2015), and the editor of John Richard Dennett's The South As It Is, 1865-1866 (University of Alabama Press, 2010). She currently serves as the co-editor of the University of North Carolina Press's Civil War America series and as president of the Society of Civil War Historians. 

Watson Jennison is an Assistant Professor of History at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, where he teaches courses on the American South, race, and slavery.  Dr. Jennison received his Ph.D. from the University of Virginia in 2005.  His first book, Cultivating Race:  The Expansion of Slavery in Georgia, 1750-1860 was published by the University of Kentucky in 2012.

Christian Keller is a Professor of Military History and Strategy at the U.S. Army War College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. He is the author of Chancellorsville and the Germans: Nativism, Ethnicity, and Civil War Memory (Fordham University Press, 2008), and the co-author of Damn Dutch: Pennsylvania Germans at Gettysburg (Stackpole Books, 2004).

Barbara Krauthamer is an Associate Professor of History at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, where she teaches classes on U.S. antebellum history, slavery and emancipation, African American history, Native American history, and critical race and gender theory.  Dr. Krauthamer’s first book, Black Slaves, Indian Masters: Slavery, Emancipation, and Citizenship in the Native American South was published by the University of North Carolina Press in 2013.  She is also the co-author of Envisioning Emancipation: Black Americans and the End of Slavery (Temple University Press, 2013).  She is currently working on a study of runaway slave women as intellectual and political actors that examines the meanings and manifestations of freedom in their lives.

Andrew Lang is an Assistant Professor of History at Mississippi State University, where he teaches classes in 19th-century U.S. history, the Civil War and Reconstruction, American military history, and the U.S. South.  Dr. Lang is the author of Waging Peace in the Wake of War: United States Soldiers, Military Occupation, and the American Civil War Era (currently under contract with Louisiana State University Press), as well as several scholarly essays.

Susanna Lee is an Associate Professor of History at North Carolina State University, where she teaches classes on 19th-century U.S. history, the Civil War, Reconstruction, and the American South.  Her first book, Claiming the Union: Citizenship in the Post-Civil War South, was published in 2014 with Cambridge University Press. She is currently working on two book manuscripts—one on the Dakota War, and one on civilians in central Virginia during the Civil War.  Dr. Lee also works in digital humanities, teaches digital history classes, and serves as a project manager of the “Valley of the Shadow: Two Communities in the American Civil War” project at the Virginia Center for Digital History.

William A. Link is the Richard J. Milbauer Professor of history at the University of Florida, where he teaches courses on 19th-century U.S. history, antebellum politics, and the Progressive Era.  He received his Ph.D. in American history from the University of Virginia in 1981.  His publications include: A Hard Country and a Lonely Place: Schooling, Society, and Reform in Rural Virginia, 1870-1920 (University of North Carolina Press, 1986), The Paradox of Southern Progressivism 1880-1920 (University of North Carolina Press, 1992), Roots of Secession: Slavery and Politics in Antebellum Virginia (University of North Carolina Press, 2002), and most recently, Righteous Warrior: Jesse Helms and the Rise of Modern Conservatism (St. Martin’s Press, 2008).

Ashley Whitehead Luskey is an Instructor of History at West Virginia University, an independent historical consultant, and an independent contractor with the Civil War Institute.  She earned her Ph.D. in History from West Virginia University in 2014. Her dissertation, “A Debt Of Honor: Elite Women’s Rituals of Cultural Authority in the Confederate Capital,” examines slaveholding women’s use of cultural rituals, social performance, and appropriations of public space as means to try to institute social and moral order in Richmond, VA during the Civil War. Dr. Luskey has extensive experience in public history, including more than 8 years of work with the National Park Service as an interpretive ranger, historian, and co-planner of Sesquicentennial events at Richmond National Battlefield Park.  She has delivered numerous talks pertaining to the Civil War and a variety of public history issues at both academic and public history conferences, and at various public events and venues. Her work has been published in the Gettysburg College Journal of the Civil War Era, Civil War Times, and will appear in a forthcoming special issue of the journal Civil War History.  She also maintains a professional web site and public history blog.

Anne Marshall is an Associate Professor of History at Mississippi State University.  She teaches classes on the U.S. South, memory, women’s history, and 19th- and 20th-century U.S. history.  Her most recent publications include Creating a Confederate Kentucky: The Lost Cause and Civil War Memory in a Border State (University of North Carolina Press, 2010), and “The Jack Burden of Southern History: Robert Penn Warren, C. Vann Woodward, and Historical Practice,” in Storytelling, History, and the Postmodern South, edited by Jason Phillips (Louisiana State University Press, 2013).

James Marten is a Professor of History at Marquette University, where he teaches courses in U.S. history, the Civil War, and childhood in America. He is the author of numerous books and essays, including Sing Not War: Civil War Veterans in Gilded Age America (University of North Carolina Press, 2011), Children and Youth during the Gilded Age and Progressive Era (New York University Press, 2014), and America’s Corporal: James Tanner in War and Peace (University of Georgia Press, 2014). Dr. Marten also is the editor of several essay collections, including Children and Youth during the Civil War Era (New York University Press, 2012), and the Co-General Senior Editor of Cultural History of Childhood and Family (Berg Publishers, 2010).

Kathryn Shively Meier is an Assistant Professor of History at Virginia Commonwealth University, where she teaches courses on 19th century U.S. history, the Civil War, American military history, and environmental history. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Virginia in 2010.  Her first book, Nature’s Civil War: Common Soldiers and the Environment in 1862 Virginia (University of North Carolina Press, 2013) was the winner of the Wiley-Silvery Prize for the best first book on the Civil War.  Dr. Meier is currently working on a biography of General Jubal Early.

Brian Craig Miller is an Associate Professor of History at Emporia State University, where he teaches classes in 19th-century U.S. history, southern history, American military history, African American history, and historical memory.  His publications include: A Punishment on the Nation: An Iowa Soldier Endures the Civil War (Kent State University Press, 2012), John Bell Hood and the Fight for Civil War Memory (University of Tennessee Press, 2010), and Empty Sleeves: Amputation in the Civil War South (University of Georgia Press, 2015).   Dr. Miller is the co-editor of the inaugural series “The Civil War Era in the South,” published through Kent State University Press, and is the forthcoming editor of the journal Civil War History.  He is currently working on a new project about Walt Disney and Civil War memory that is under contract with the University of Georgia Press.

Jennifer Murray is an Assistant Professor of History at the University of Virginia-Wise, where she teaches American history, public history, oral history, and courses on the Gilded Age and the Vietnam War.  Her research explores the interplay between warfare and the creation and perpetuation of historical memory.  She earned her Ph.D. from Auburn University in 2010. Her first book is entitled On a Great Battlefield: The Making, Management, and Memory of Gettysburg National Military Park, 1933-2009 (University of Tennessee Press, 2014).

Megan Kate Nelson is a writer, historian, and cultural critic.  She received her Ph.D. in American Studies from the University of Iowa, and has taught at Texas Tech University, California State University at Fullerton, Harvard University, and Brown University.  Based in Lincoln, Massachusetts, she writes for the New York Times “Disunionblog, JSTOR Daily, The Chronicle of Higher Education, and Civil War Times.  She is the author of Ruin Nation: Destruction and the American Civil War (University of Georgia Press, 2012) and Trembling Earth: A Cultural History of the Okefenokee Swamp (University of Georgia Press, 2005).  She also maintains the blog Historista.

Jared Peatman serves as the Director of Curriculum at the Lincoln Leadership Institute.  A 2002 graduate of Gettysburg College, he earned his M.A. from Virginia Tech in 2006 and a Ph.D. from Texas A&M in 2010.  His dissertation on the legacy of Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address earned him the 2012 Hay-Nicolay Dissertation Award. His first book, The Long Shadow of Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address, was released in 2013 from Southern Illinois University Press.

Jason Phillips is the Eberly Professor of Civil War Studies as West Virginia University, where he teaches classes on 19th-century U.S. history, the Civil War, and Reconstruction.  He is the author of Diehard Rebels: The Confederate Culture of Invincibility (University of North Carolina press in 2007) and the editor of Storytelling, History, and the Postmodern South (University of North Carolina Press, 2013).  He is currently at work on a second book, Civil War Looming: A History of the Future, which examines how Americans anticipated the Civil War and how those prophecies ultimately shaped their experiences and memories of the war.

K. Stephen Prince is an Assistant Professor of History at the University of South Florida, where he teaches courses in 19th- and 20th-century American history, the U.S. South, the Gilded Age and Progressive Era, historical memory, African American history, and race in U.S. history.  He received his Ph.D. from Yale University in 2010.  His first book, Stories of the South: Race and the Reconstruction of Southern Identity, 1865-1915 was published by the University of North Carolina Press in 2014.  He is currently working on a book project entitled The Ballad of Robert Charles: Race, Violence, and Memory in the Jim Crow South.  Dr. Prince is also the author of Radical Reconstruction: A Brief History with Documents, published by Bedford-St. Martin’s in 2015 as part of the “Bedford Series in History and Culture.”

Brooks Simpson is the ASU Foundation Professor of History at Arizona State University. He earned his Ph.D. at the University of Wisconsin at Madison in 1989.  Dr. Simpson specializes in U.S. political and military history and the history of the Civil War era and Reconstruction.  His numerous publications include: The Reconstruction Presidents (University Press of Kansas, 2009), Union and Emancipation: Essays on Politics and Race in the Civil War Era (Kent State University Press, 2009, a volume co-edited with David Blight), The Civil War in the East, 1861-1865 (Potomac Books, 2013), and The Civil War: The Third Year Told by Those Who Lived It, an edited volume published in 2013 by the Library of America.  He also maintains the blog Crossroads.

Andrew Slap is an Associate Professor of History at East Tennessee State University where he teaches courses in 19th-century U.S. history, the Civil War era, African American history, political and social history, and Appalachian history.  He also serves as the series editor for “Reconstructing America” and “The North’s Civil War,” both published through Fordham University Press.  Dr. Slap is the author of several books and scholarly articles, including The Doom of Reconstruction: The Liberal Republican in the Civil War Era (Fordham University Press, 2006)He is also the editor of This Distracted and Anarchical People: New Answers for Old Questions About the Civil War-Era North (Fordham University Press, 2013), and Reconstructing Appalachia: The Civil War’s Aftermath (The University Press of Kentucky, 2010).  Dr. Slap is currently working on a new book about African- American communities in Memphis, as well as two collections of essays about the North and the urban South during the Civil War era.

Diane Sommerville is an Associate Professor of History at Binghamton University, where she teaches courses in 19th-century U.S. history, the American South, U.S. women’s history, Civil War and Reconstruction, the history of sexuality, and African American history.  Her first book, Rape and Race in the Nineteenth-Century South, was published by the University of North Carolina Press in 2004.  She is also the author of numerous scholarly articles and essays, including " ‘A Burden Too Heavy to Bear': War Trauma, Suicide and Confederate Soldiers," (Civil War History, December 2013), which received the 2014 John T. Hubbell Prize for the best article published in the journal Civil War History in 2013. Dr. Sommerville is currently working on a book about suicide among southerners during and after the Civil War that explores how gender shaped decisions about suicide in the wake of the war’s physical and emotional devastation.

Christopher Stowe is an Associate Professor of Military History at the Marine Corps University in Quantico.  Prior to arriving at the University’s Command & Staff College, Dr. Stowe spent eight years with the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College at Fort Lee, Virginia.  He is currently working on a book entitled George Gordon Meade: A Nineteenth-Century Life, which is under contract with Kent State University Press.

Mark W. Summers is the Thomas D. Clark Professor of History at the University of Kentucky, where he teaches classes in 19th-century U.S. history and political history.  His most recent publications include Rum, Romanism, and Rebellion: The Making of a President, 1884 (University of North Carolina Press, 2000), and A Dangerous Stir: Fear, Paranoia, and the Making of Reconstruction (University of North Carolina Press, 2009).

Jill Ogline Titus is the Associate Director of the Civil War Institute at Gettysburg College.  She also teaches public history and courses about the modern black freedom struggle in America.  Her research focuses on 20th-century African American history, massive resistance, and public history, with a particular interest in the intersection of African American history and public memory.  Dr. Titus has authored several scholarly articles and reviews, in addition to publishing a book entitled Brown’s Battleground:  Students, Segregations, and the Struggle for Justice in Prince Edward County, Virginia (University of North Carolina Press, 2011), which was a finalist for the Library of Virginia Literary Award.

Susannah Ural is a Professor of History at the University of Southern Mississippi and the Co-Director of the Dale Center for the Study of War & Society.  She teaches courses on the U.S. Civil War era and 19th-century America. Dr. Ural has authored several books and scholarly articles, including The Harp and the Eagle: Irish-American Volunteers and the Union Army, 1861-1865 (New York University Press, 2006), and Don’t Hurry Me Down to Hades: The Civil War in the Words of Those Who Lived It (Osprey Press, 2013).   She also co-edited an essay collection entitled Civil War Citizens: Race, Ethnicity, and Identity in America’s Bloodiest Conflict (New York University Press, 2010).  Her most recent book, Hood’s Boy: The Soldiers and Families of Hood’s Texas Brigade, was published by Louisiana State University Press in 2015.  Dr. Ural is currently working on a co-edited collection of diaries, letters, and poetry entitled Voices of the Texas Brigade, as well as editing a Texas Brigade family’s correspondence for a project entitled This Murderous Storm: A Confederate Family at War.

Follow us on Facebook and Twitter and join our mailing list.

Twitter  facebook  Gettysburg Compiler

Gettysburg 

College

300 North Washington St.
Gettysburg, PA 17325
P: (717) 337-6300